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Posts Tagged ‘diabetic recipes’

“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

Last time you learned that certain herbs can be helpful for diabetics when using them directly for the condition or for likely companion concerns. Today, here’s some recipes to help with the fabulous 10 – Turmeric, Garlic, Mint, Parsley, Rosemary, Chili, Cinnamon, Ginger, Basil and Lavender!

After visiting beautiful lavender fields in California and Oregon, I have to say that I want to speak about this time-honored herb first, as it is the one which you are least likely to be familiar with (although you may already have some in the famous herb mix called Herbes de Provence).

The owners of Hood River Lavender Farm provide some great recipes for their Organic Lavender as well as a place to purchase it dried.  The link is in the Reference section.

Every time I have tasted lavender in food, I have been intrigued. As with all food-stuffs, I recommend only organic produce, so if you are just grabbing lavender at the nursery or from a friend’s garden, please be sure that it has not been chemically-sprayed (as outside France or England, it’s not likely to have been regarded as a food plant).

The Farm site gives a little history of the herb:

” While most of us know about the beauty and fragrance of Lavender, somehow we have forgotten that it is indeed an herb. An herb that may not be common place in American spice cabinets, it has been in use as a culinary herb for centuries … One’s imagination is the only limit when cooking with this varable herb.

Lavender varies in taste just as it varies in appearance and aroma. The English Lavenders (angustifolia) are the prefered lavenders to use as culinary as they are milder, sweeter, and do not over-power the dish. Within these varieties there is still more variation when used as a culinary herb. Provence lavender, a hybrid known as a lavandin, is an exception to the rule. Because of it’s milder flavor it is often used when English Lavender is not available, and some cooks even prefer it above angustifolia.

Our personal favorite is a pink-flowered English lavender known as Melissa. It has a sweet, yet floral note, and enhances dishes from soups, to meat, and even drinks and deserts.

All culinary lavender blends very well with citrus, mint, rosemary, sage, berries, fruit, meats, drinks, and one should use some caution to not use too much.

Lavender should be a background flavor, not in the forefront, and when used in proportion enhances foods with a distinctive and mysterious flavor, while adding a lovely color to your dish.”

Here are some Lavender recipes to try!
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Honey Lavender Shake – Rockin’ Raw-style Vegan

2 T Raw almond butter
2 T Raw honey (not for use for children under 3 years old) *
3 vanilla beans (use vanilla extract, if more flavor desired; less expensive, too)

1 t organic Lavender – minced

1 tray of small ice cubes
1/2C spring water (to desired thickness for the shake)

Blend until smooth. Serve in tall glass and garnish with a little of the Lavender

Variation: Almond milk can be made with soaked almonds and
water in a blender. Then strain it through a nut milk bag. Omit the 1/2 cup of water in recipe above if using almond milk.

You can also purchase almond milk in cartons (and the protein content of this recipe will be better than when just using water).

This is a useful recipe for those with sensitivities to dairy.

* Raw honey is not acceptable for the immune systems of children under 3, so use pasteurized honey in this case.

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Lavender Grilled Salmon or Steelhead

3 pounds of wild salmon (filet)*
4 T raw honey
6 T organic extra-virgin or virgin olive oil
1 T organic Lavender, crushed or run through a spice grinder
1/4C white wine
1 T Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce
1 T lime or lemon juice

* do NOT use farmed fish!

Place all ingredients, except salmon, in a saucepan over moderate heat, stirring with a wire whisk at all times until the ingredients are reduced by 1/3, to create a sauce.

When sauce has cooled slightly, divide the sauce into halves. With one portion, baste the raw salmon filet.

Grill or bake salmon until flaky (don’t overcook), about 10 minutes, basting with the same portion of sauce, if desired.

Use the second sauce portion to pour on salmon just before serving, as it has not been in contact with the raw fish at all.

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Sweet Potato Pie with Lavender

This recipe also uses Cinnamon, another one of your diabetic-friendly herbs and spices. I did not use the sugary topping in the original recipe, but rather added the lavender into the pie itself. Sweet potatoes are also a fabulous food for diabetics!

2 medium, organic  sweet potatoes, peeled and chopped into 1/2″ cubes
4 T unsalted organic butter, melted
2 T fresh lemon juice
1/2 t freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 t ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp Celtic sea salt or other sea salt
3 lg free-range, vegetarian-fed, eggs, separated
1/2C sugar (better: use the equivalent of Stevia! Check the box for the amount.)
2 T all-purpose whole-grain flour OR ground quinoa
3/4C organic buttermilk

1/2t organic lavender, minced (or use a spice grinder)

1. Preheat your oven to 375 F. Pour 1 1/2″ of water into a medium stockpot (with a strainer basket) and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Next, add the sweet potatoes to the basket, cover, and steam until fork-tender, about 20 minutes. Strain the sweet potatoes and place them in a large bowl. Let them cool to near room temperature, covered with paper towel to absorb the steam.

Mash the potatoes to a smooth puree, (about 1 1/4 cups). Add the organic butter, lemon juice, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt; mix after each addition.

2. Then, in a small bowl, beat the egg yolks lightly with a whisk for about 30 seconds. Add sugar/ Stevia and beat until they’re a creamy lemon-yellow color, about 1 1/2 minutes.

Add egg mixture to sweet potato mixture and then stir until the eggs are thoroughly incorporated and filling is consistently bright-orange in color.

Next, add flour a little at a time, stirring after each addition, until thoroughly incorporated.

Finally, add the buttermilk and lavender. Stir until mixed in.

3. With a clean, dry whisk and in a clean, dry, separate bowl, whisk the egg whites to soft peaks, about 1 1/2 minutes or use your mixer until results are achieved.

Gently fold egg whites into sweet potato-buttermilk mixture until blended, using a vertical figure-8 motion with a spatula.

Pour the mixture into a prepared piecrust. Bake on the middle rack of your oven until the center is firm and set, about 35-40 minutes.

4. Remove pie from oven and cool completely on a rack. Enjoy!

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Lavender Infusion

This can be used in other recipes — as varied as cheescake, sorbets, ice-cream, lemonade and more.

Measure 2T Lavender buds for each cup boiling temperature liquid (water) or (organic milk // organic cream).

Steep for 30 minutes.  Strain the lavender from the liquid.

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Lavender Tea

Steep 1 t lavender in 1 cup of water for 3-5 minutes.
This is a good recipe for insomnia, or when relaxation is the goal.

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Lavender Lemonade

1 quart fresh squeezed or pre-made lemonade
1 t to 1T culinary lavender
1C boiling water

Pour the boiling water over the lavender in a heat-proof bowl and allow to steep for 10 minutes. Strain out the lavender and add to the lemonade. Serve well chilled.

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Lavender-Ginger Apple Cider

This recipe includes Ginger — another one of our 10 helpful-to-diabetics herbs and spices!

1 gallon organic apple cider
6 T organic Culinary Lavender “Signature Blend” (Hood River Lavender Farm)
2 t fresh grated ginger
1 med. culinary muslin bag or some cheese cloth

Bring the apple cider to a simmer, and then turn heat to low. Add the muslin bag filled with culinary lavender and ginger (or several layers of cheesecloth and some thread). Cover, and simmer 15 minutes to infuse. Remove the spice bag. Serve warm.

You can use this as a cool drink, too. The recipe makes 16 cups.

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Lavender, Rosemary, Garlic, Black Olive Foccacia Bread

You struck the Mother-Lode. This recipe includes Lavender, Rosemary, and Garlic and Black Pepper or Chili Pepper — more of those diabetic friendly herbs and spices as well as heart-healthy olives!

Prep time: 20 min.
Cooking time: 12-15 min.
Servings: 6

1 lb fast pizza dough OR 1 pound frozen bread or pizza dough, thawed
2 T extra-virgin olive oil
¼ C pitted, chopped imported black olives – like Kalamata
2t chopped lavender buds
1 – 2T chopped fresh rosemary
2 cloves minced garlic
1 t coarse Celtic sea salt or other sea salt
freshly ground black pepper to taste OR a tiny pinch of cayenne pepper (better)

Lightly oil a large baking sheet. On a work surface, roll pizza dough out into an 8 x 14 rectangle. Transfer to prepared baking sheet and cover with a clean dish towel, let rise at room temperature for 20 min.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 450F.

After this final rising on the baking sheet, gently make dimples into the  dough with finger tips.

Brush on 2 Tp olive oil; then add herb mixture, pressing it gently into the top of the dough.

Herb Mix is:  1 -2t chopped lavender, 2T rosemary, 2 cloves minced garlic and the chopped olives.

Sprinkle with 1 t coarse sea salt and a little fresh black pepper or cayenne. Bake 12 – 15 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on wire rack, then cut into pieces to serve.

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REFERENCE:
Enjoy the recipes and be sure to check out Hood River Lavender Farm.

Best to all — Em

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar. The extra page links are at the bottom of the first page.

You can also sign-up for email alerts for when I post to this blog. I try for once a week. The form is on the upper right of the side-bar. Thanks.

(c)2011 Em at http://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

The past 4 posts have been laying out the case about why Omega 3 fats are especially essential to fight diabetes and the accompanying physical issues which diabetics often wrestle with. Here’s some more about Omega 3 fish sources as well as  recipes to use as basics, in your kitchen!

For cold-water fish sources of Omega 3s, it’s important to know the “provenance” of the fish (i.e. what exact species and where they were fished).

Most lists just say Omega 3 sources are ‘cold water fish’. Sometimes they mention species (like “cod”, “salmon” etc.), but this is NOT good enough!

If we are to protect the oceans and ourselves, we must know more and then act to “preserve the natural fishery” and eat clean, pristine fish!

Here’s some more complete information about these “cold-water” fish and keep yourself updated at the Environmental Defense Fund site and Monterey Bay Aquarium “Seafood Watch” site!

Cold-water Omega-3 species to be AVOIDED are:

___   Atlantic cod – due to overfishing

___   Pacific cod (from imported sources) – poor product, bad environment

___  farmed salmon, from anywhere! same as above for cod

Cold-water Omega-3 speciesBest Choices are:

___   Arctic Char – farmed in fast, natural streams, in America and Norway and in cleaned recirculating closed systems. Also called Iwana and Alpine Char

___   Pacific cod – farmed US west coast – fished using bottom long-line technique or trap or hook-and-line, only

___   Pacific halibut, caught US waters

___   Sablefish / Black cod – wild, Alaska and British Columbia; California, Oregon and Washington have an Acceptable rating for the sustenance of the fishery. They are second choice. Sablefish should also be used to substitute for “Unagi”, freshwater eel, in sushi and other Japanese recipes, as Unagi is in jeopardy. Season: fresh is May – October. Frozen, all year.

___   Salmon – wild, Alaska

___   Pacific sardines, US waters only

___   Rainbow trout – farmed in US, only

Acceptable for the moment:

___   Alaska pollock as fish, not when processed as fake krab, surimi etc.

___   Salmon, wild – from north of Cape Falcon, Oregon (but Washington catch is high in mercury – so don’t eat often — none of this Washington state catch is for kids or if pregnant).

Here are a few special recipes from Monterey Bay Aquarium species which are sustainable and responsibly produced and harvested.

Find out about the status of the fisheries in your nation. The statements above are from the US, but highlight that there definitely are problems in parts of the world, especially where fish are being farmed or where there are little or no laws about pollution.

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Arctic Char, like Trout, is a cousin of Salmon. As such all sub-species have great Omega-3 profiles. Feel free to use them all year. Whole Foods and good health stores will carry it. Ask the fishmonger in your regular supermarket if they can order it, too.

ARCTIC  CHAR WITH FENNEL AND ORANGE

Serves: 4

4 med fennel bulbs, trimmed, cut lengthwise into 1-inch wide wedges, some fronds minced and reserved for garnish
2 lg red onions, peeled, cut through the stem end into 1-inch wide wedges
2 T olive oil, plus more as needed
4 t grated orange zest (from about 3 oranges), divided
1¾ t fennel seeds, crushed coarsely in mortar with pestle if desired, divided
coarse kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
4 Arctic char fillets, 5-6 ounces each
1/4 C balsamic vinegar
1/4 C fresh orange juice
2 t firmly packed brown sugar

Arrange one rack in the upper third of your oven and one rack in the lower third of the oven, then preheat to 450º F.

Combine the fennel wedges and onions in a large bowl, and then add the 2 tablespoons of the oil, 1 1/2 teaspoons of the orange zest, and 1 teaspoon of the fennel seeds. Toss to coat the vegetables. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and toss again.

Arrange vegetables in a single layer on a large, rimmed baking sheet, then place on the upper oven rack. Roast for 15 minutes.

Stir the vegetables and continue roasting until tender and beginning to brown, which will be about 15 minutes longer.

In the meantime, brush a small, rimmed baking sheet with olive oil. Also brush the skin of the fish with olive oil. Place skin side down on the prepared baking sheet. Brush on more olive oil to the  top of the fish and sprinkle with salt, pepper, 1 1/2 teaspoons of the orange zest and remaining ¾ teaspoon of fennel seeds.

After the vegetables have roasted for 20 minutes, place the pan with the fish on the lower oven rack and cook the fish until it feels springy when pressed in the center. This will take  about 8-10 minutes, depending on the thickness of the fish.

Another test of doneness: make a small incision in the thickest part of the fish. The flesh should be just opaque in the center. If it’s still translucent, then cook it a few minutes longer.

While the fish is cooking, mix the vinegar, orange juice, brown sugar and remaining 1 teaspoon grated orange zest in a large skillet. Stir until the sugar dissolves, and then simmer over medium heat until thickened to a syrupy texture.  Stir it frequently, for about 3 minutes, then remove from the heat.

Divide the vegetables and fish among 4 pre-warmed plates, saving the juices from the fish pan. Next, stir 3-4 teaspoons of the fish juices into the balsamic sauce. Spoon all of the sauce over the fish and vegetables. Sprinkle lightly with chopped fennel fronds and serve immediately.

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PACIFIC COD CHOWDER

Serves: 4

4  slices applewood-smoked “bacon” (1/4 pound), chopped (optional)*
1 lg onion, chopped
2 bay leaves
1 t minced fresh thyme
1/4 t paprika
(3) 8-ounce bottles clam juice OR fish broth
1/2 C spring or filtered water
1 pound organic Yukon gold potatoes, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch pieces **
1/2 C  organic whipping cream **
coarse kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
1 1/2 pounds Pacific cod, cut in 1-inch pieces
1 med bunch organic kale finely chopped (about 2 cups) **

If using, cook the “bacon” in a heavy large pot over medium heat until brown and crisp, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the bacon to a paper towel and drain.

Add the onion, bay leaves and thyme to the pot. Sauté over medium heat until the onion is tender, about 5 minutes. Stir in the paprika. Add the clam juice or broth, 1/2 cup water and then the potatoes. Bring the mixture to a low boil. Reduce heat to medium, cover and simmer until the potatoes are just tender, about 8 minutes.

Next, add the cream and bacon to the chowder. Sprinkle the cod pieces with salt and pepper then add the cod and kale to the soup. Simmer until the fish is opaque in the center (to check, cut into a piece of fish with a small knife or break apart with a spoon), stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes.

Only after you are sure that the fish IS cooked, then taste and adjust the seasonings. Ladle the chowder into warmed bowls and serve.

NOTES:
* It’s optional to use “bacon” of any sort. Frankly, it just overwhelms the taste of the fish! But, if you want a vegetarian version, then use a soy “bacon” substitute. It gives a little flavor without being overwhelming, and it keeps the dish kosher, too.

** These 2 vegetables and the cream MUST BE ORGANIC! Why?

Regular potatoes are covered in fungicides.

Regular kale is often grown in polluted fields to draw-out the pollutants!

All fatty dairy products harbor environmental toxins unless they are organically-produced, with care.

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PACIFIC COD TACOS

I personally feel that the Fish Taco is Mexico’s greatest contribution to world-cuisine. I know there are other great Mexican meals, like adobos etc., but this is MY favorite!  Taco del Mar, si!

Serves: 4

Marinated Cod

1/4 C T  olive oil
2 T chopped fresh cilantro
1 1/2 T  fresh lemon juice
1 t  ground achiote* (ground annatto seed) (optional)
1 garlic clove, crushed
1 1/4-1 1/2 pounds Pacific cod

Cumin-Lime Aioli

1/2 C organic  mayonnaise
2 T  cold-pressed, extra-virgin olive oil
1 small garlic clove, finely chopped
1 1/2 T  fresh lemon juice
1 T  fresh lime juice
1/2 t ground cumin
1/4 t  ground coriander
1/4 t  cayenne pepper
pinch of white pepper or freshly ground black pepper
coarse Celtic sea salt

Pico de Gallo

2 med. organic red tomatoes seeded, diced
1 med. organic yellow tomato, diced
1 sm.    red onion, finely chopped
1/3 C  chopped fresh cilantro
2 T  fresh lime juice
2 T  fresh lemon juice
1 T  cold-pressed, extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 jalapeño chile, minced
4 shakes hot pepper sauce (such as Tabasco)

1/2 sm.  head organic red cabbage
8-12 organic corn tortillas
olive oil (for frying)
all-purpose flour

Cooking the Marinated Cod

Combine the oil, cilantro, lemon juice, (achiote) and garlic in a medium bowl. Cut the cod lengthwise into 3 x ¾- inch strips. Add to the marinade and stir to coat. Cover and refrigerate at least 1 hour and up to 2 hours.

Making the Aioli

Combine the mayonnaise, oil, garlic, lemon juice, lime juice, cumin, coriander, cayenne and pepper in a medium bowl and mix to blend. Season to taste with salt. (Can be prepared 2 days ahead; cover and refrigerate.)

For the Pico de Gallo

Combine the red and yellow tomatoes, onion, cilantro, lime juice, lemon juice, olive oil, jalapeno and hot pepper sauce in a medium bowl. Mix to blend. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Cut the cabbage half in thirds through the core. Slice very thinly or shred on a v-slicer or a mandolin.

Warm the tortillas in the oven or on top of the stove.

To warm in the oven, preheat to 250º F. Wrap the tortillas in foil and heat in the oven while cooking the cod.

To heat on top of the stove, working with one tortilla at a time, place directly on a gas burner or hot, dry skillet and cook until beginning to brown in spots, about 20 seconds on each side. Wrap in foil to keep warm.

To Cook the Cod:

Cover the bottom of a heavy large skillet generously with olive oil and warm over medium-high heat.

Place some flour on a medium plate. Working in batches, remove the cod from the marinade, turn in the flour to coat, and add to the skillet (do not crowd).

Cook the cod until crisp, beginning to flake, and opaque in the center, about 3 minutes on each side. (The fish will start to separate into opaque flakes when it’s cooked through.)

Transfer to paper towels and drain. If the browned bits in the skillet become dark brown, pour off the oil, wipe out the skillet and add fresh oil. Sprinkle the cooked cod with salt and pepper.

Arrange 2 or 3 warm tortillas on each plate. Spread each with a little aioli and arrange fish strips in the center. Using a slotted spoon, dress with pico de gallo and top with shredded cabbage. Serve immediately.

*Ground achiote, also called ground annatto seed, is a deep red powder that gives the cod a rich, warm color. It can be found in Latin American, Indian and specialty food stores. Turmeric could also be used and it has real nutritional value as an anti-inflammatory.

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SABLEFISH – GENMAI CHA TEA SOUP

Makes 4 servings
Total Time: 65 minutes

2 C  short-grain organic brown rice
1 t Celtic sea salt, divided
1 package (about 0.8 oz.) toasted, seasoned nori seaweed*
2 green onions
2 t  organic oil
1 pound black cod (about 2 fillets) **
8 tea bags of genmaicha ***
4 C filtered water or spring water
8 more Cups – filtered water
1 t  black sesame seeds (white are 2nd choice)
tamari (a rich, traditionally-made Japanese soy sauce)(optional)
toasted sesame oil

In a medium saucepan, bring rice, 1/2 tsp. salt and 4 cups water to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to a simmer, and cook until rice is tender to the bite, about 50 minutes — or use a rice cooker using their proportions for the amount of water needed for 2C rice (dry). Remove rice from heat, uncover, and fluff with a fork.

Meanwhile, cut nori into 1/4-inch strips and set aside. Slice green onions crosswise (including green parts) and set aside.

Preheat broiler.

Rub a baking sheet with oil.

Put fish on sheet and turn over to oil both sides. Sprinkle with remaining 1/2 tsp. salt. Broil 3 to 4 inches away from broiler until cooked through (flesh flakes easily and is opaque in the center), about 5 minutes. Transfer fish to a plate and set aside.

When rice is cooked, bring 8 cups water to a boil in a saucepan. In a large teapot, measuring cup, or pitcher, pour the boiling water over tea bags. Let steep 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, put 1 cup rice in each of 4 large soup bowls. Place 1/2 fish fillet on each bed of rice. Pour 2 cups hot tea over each. Sprinkle with green onion and black sesame seeds. Serve immediately, with bowls of nori, tamari, and sesame oil on the side.

* Nori is the green-black seaweed used to wrap sushi rolls. It is easy to cut into strips with kitchen shears. Nori, tamari and sesame oil will all be available in a good health store.

** try to choose fillets of even thickness.

*** Genmai Cha comes in boxes in Asian (especially Japanese) markets. It is a green tea paired with roasted rice grains. It has a delicate, nutty flavor.

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REFERENCE WITH RECIPES:
Omega 3 for Diabetics – Part 1
Omega 3 Foods for Diabetics – Part 2
Diabetics Need Omega 3 – Part 3
Omega 3 Helps Diabetes – Part 4

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar. The extra page links are at the bottom of the first page.

You can also sign-up for email alerts for when I post to this blog. I try for once a week. The form is on the upper right of the side-bar. Thanks.

(c)2011 Em at http://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

More hemp recipes this week as this food’s Omega-3 essential fats are so important for our biochemistry – whether it is to feed our brains, reduce body-wide inflammation’s destruction (really important, especially for our pancreas). We cannot make these fats. Our choice of daily foods must supply them! Have you had yours today?!

Cold water fish, fish oils, organic chia, hemp and flax seeds are the main sources for Omega-3 essential fatty acids. Hemp seeds are the best power-house source.

You must never heat any Omega-3 source higher than 350F, but I say 325F (to allow a safer range and to allow for improperly-calibrated stoves and griddles).  If you are using a frypan, you need to know the temperature of the cooking surface. Thermostatically-controlled griddles are better for those tasks, when possible.

For the seeds, just use them raw! That way, you save most of their precious nutrition. The previous recipes in this series are linked to below.

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EVE DION’S HEMP PATE

This is a very versatile pate recipe that can be made interchangeably with Hempseeds, Chia Seeds, Coconut Manna (organic, extra-virgin coconut oil) and more! You can use this recipe for things like: dip for chips, spreads, pastas or even on non-leafy salads! If desired, include a wider range of veggies, nuts, and add curry powder or fresh coconut.

1 C raw cashews, soaked
1/2 C Nutiva hempseed
1 organic red bell pepper *
4-5 T nutritional yeast
juice of 1 organic lemon
1 T organic miso paste
1 organic carrot, medium size
sea salt to taste

Optional:
Dash of organic maple syrup *
organic black pepper
organic smokey paprika

Blend everything in a food processor until it reaches a “pate” or “hummus” texture.

Ideas:
___   use as a dip for veggies or bread
___  spread on crackers, toast, or inside a wrap
___  mix with cooked grains or even pasta or salad

* make sure these are organic foods as bell peppers and maples are heavily sprayed when producing these foods.

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HEMP-CHIA CEREAL
serves: 1

This makes a delicious winter or summer breakfast treat.  Soak chia seeds for 5 minutes in hot or cold liquid. Add sliced fruit, hempseed and syrup.

2 T chia seeds
1 T Nutiva hempseed
3 – 4oz spring water or organic, not ultra-pasteurized dairy milk OR hemp milk
Organic only:  apple (with skin), banana or berries or a mix of these fruits
organic maple, syrup to taste

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HEMP TOMATO COULIS PASTA SAUCE

3   fresh organic or hydroponic tomatoes – diced
1 T  organic honey
2 T  rice wine vinegar
2 T  each freshly minced parsley, basil and oregano
1/3 C  hemp oil *
cooked vegetables, eggs or noodles, as desired

Mix first four ingredients in blender, then slowly drizzle in hemp oil, continue mixing until emulsified.

Serve cold over chilled potato and / or sweet potato chunks with hard-boiled egg as garnish OR use as a fresh sauce to top hot or cold pasta or Asian noodles.

* Hemp oil must always be refrigerated and NEVER cooked with!

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CABBAGE, AVOCADO AND HEMP SLAW

Serves: 4

1/4 C  organic red and yellow peppers, diced
6 C  finely shredded organic cabbage (or mix of red, green and savoy)
1  1/2  avocados, diced
3 T  Nutiva Organic Hemp Oil *
1 1/2 T   organic lemon juice
2 T  red onion, diced
1/4 C  Nutiva organic shelled hemp seeds
3 T   coriander leaves
1/2 t  Himalayan salt OR Celtic sea salt

In a large mixing bowl toss all ingredients together. Serve immediately.

As a variation, you can add chopped fresh herbs or diced vegetables. This dish works equally well if you substitute organic kale, chard or spinach.

Note: Toss right before serving to retain crispness.

* Hemp oil must always be refrigerated and NEVER cooked with!

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HEMP VINAIGRETTE SALAD DRESSING

1 part Nutiva organic cold-pressed Hemp Oil *
1 part organic, extra-virgin olive oil
1 part organic apple cider vinegar or organic lemon juice

Blend ingredients and add organic soy sauce or tamari, sea salt, and desired dried herbs for flavoring.

Also consider adding organic sesame seed tahini to make it a more creamy dressing.

* Hemp oil must always be refrigerated and NEVER cooked with!

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HEMP FLAT BREAD

Liliana in Florida has made a useful flatbread // cracker from hemp and wheat or spelt flour.

1 C  organic, unbleached white whole-wheat flour or organic spelt flour
2 C  hemp flour
1/2 C  organic wheat germ
1 C  organic granola
1 t  baking soda
1 t  baking powder – non-aluminum type (like Rumford’s)
1/2 C   organic honey
1 C  organic sesame seeds (or ground nuts)
2 eggs – free-range, vegetarian-fed
1 T  organic butter
1 C  organic, not ultra-pasteurized milk OR organic almond milk

Later: serve with 1/2 C  organic jam OR hummus

Mix dry ingredients, then combine and mix with the rest of the ingredients.
Spread on greased pan, to an even thickness.

Try to score part way through the batter in the portion size you desire.

Bake at 325 F for about 35 minutes. Serve with jam or desired topping (including hummus).

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REFERENCE:

Diabetics Needs Omega 3
Diabetic Hemp Recipes

Best to all — Em

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar. The extra page links are at the bottom of the first page.

You can also sign-up for email alerts for when I post to this blog. I try for once a week. The form is on the upper right of the side-bar. Thanks.

(c)2011 Em at http://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

Read Full Post »

“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

Yes, I know it’s Thanksgiving in America in 2 days, but my post and recipe is one for you to incorporate, even daily, as much as possible, the way the longest-lived peoples do. That’s really something to be Thankful for!

So, find a way to start this food in your diet over the 4 day holiday week-end. You won’t be sorry. The more I learn about seaweed, iodine and the complex, healing polysaccharides which it contains, the more amazed I am.

Seaweed is really the Foundational Food of Life.

This low glycemic, high nutrition food has no calories and lots of fiber, wonderful mineral content, along with great, clean taste.

The Iodine and Fucoidan in seaweed will help you to:
___ reduce weight
___ remineralize especially when stressed
___ aid thyroid and metabolic health
___ help to reduce blood sugar levels and body-wide inflammation
___ help to prevent excessive blood clotting
___ automatically thin your blood
___ protect bone marrow and kidneys
___ support healthy joint activity
___ engage your immune functions and fire-up your T cell-mediated and natural killer (NK) cells for effective anti-viral (including AIDS and herpes) and anti-cancer protection.

Yes, it’s that amazing and effective in the right quantities.

Introduce your children to this pH alkaline, life-giving food, too. Start them on better habits than you had. In the 1950’s Americans used to eat 4 times as much iodine as they do now! This current lack is probably behind most of the massive rise in chronic diseases and conditions, like diabetes, heart disease and cancer, especially breast cancer and prostate cancer.

You just cannot spend your food money more wisely than to buy organic seaweed from one of the firms which carefully source where and how it was grown. These companies are listed in the previous parts which I mention below.

I now add Mitoku Brand – Japanese foods, with some organic seaweeds to the list. Sorry I forgot you; it’s a great company, which I have also used for years and years.

Please read these articles before continuing, if you have not already been following the series.

Diabetics – Iodine and Health, Part 1
Diabetics – Iodine and Health, Part 2
Diabetics – Iodine and Health, Part 3 – includes recipe

Do NOT buy any Chinese-sourced seaweed. Assays have shown that the unrelenting pollution of their air, sea and water has resulted in arsenic in their seaweed products.

Dr. Ray Sahelian, MD states: “Fucoidan substances are sulfated polysaccharides extracted from brown algae (seaweed). Fucoidan has been studied for its diverse biological activities. It appears this substance has blood thinning properties and has an influence on the immune system.”

He continues: “Fucoidan (sulfated alpha-L-fucan) is a sulfated polysaccharide and is found primarily in the cell walls of several species of brown seaweed, such as kombu, limu moui, wakame (and mekabu), hijiki and bladderwrack.”

Most of the clinical immune research has been done on animals, using wakame and also on its special structure called mekabu (available from Eden Foods). Mekabu is the green crunchy plant in seaweed salad in sushi restaurants. See the sketch of the wakame fronds and the mekabu spiral structure, just above the life-giving holdfast support.

My discussion is all about getting these wonderful ingredients only in food, not in supplements. There’s very little human research (if any) in the amounts and concentrations placed in supplements, whereas, there are tens of thousands of years of normal, daily ingestion of these seaweeds as food, in normal appetite portions.

One teaspoon of a powdered seaweed is equivalent to eating a whole plate of seaweed. It takes about 40 pounds of seaweed to make one pound of powdered product.

The oldest Japanese recipes do not call for seaweed to be cooked (for varieties tender enough to eat this way). This may be healthier as science shows, that unlike Iodine, Fucoidan is disrupted by heat.

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from http://epicureandebauchery.blogspot.com

Seaweed Preserve (nori no tsukudani)

5 sheet nori (seaweed like the one used for sushi)
2 cups sake in 1/2 cup increments
1/2-1 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup mirin (Japanese sweet rice wine)
1/8 cup toasted sesame seeds **

1. Tear up all the nori into approximately 2 inch x 2 inch pieces
2. Pour first 1/2 cup sake into a small pan on medium heat *
3. Add nori and cook until almost all of the sake is absorbed
4. Repeat until 1 1/2 cups of sake is almost all absorbed
5. Add soy sauce, mirin, and sesame seeds
6. Add last 1/2 cup of sake
7. Cook until all of the liquid is absorbed and the seaweed has a very thick consistency.
8. Keep in an air tight container in the fridge.

Use over rice, on top of salads, over fish etc.,
For an Ochazuke:
1) For each 1/2 cup cooked brown rice, use 2 tbs seaweed preserve and 1 tsp wasabi paste, 1/4 tsp ume paste.
2) Pour on hot sencha tea, brewed strong.
3) Enjoy right away after mixing with your spoon!

* Frankly, I am going to try this recipe with just letting the seaweed absorb the incremental amounts of sake and other liquids without cooking, and see if it will absorb enough over time. No harm in trying it this way; I can always cook it a little at the end. I saw another wakame recipe that just used a no-cook absorption method, so it is possible and will keep more of the beneficial fucoidan.

** I never toast seeds; they lose too much nutrition, even on low heats. Use white and // or black sesame seeds.
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Links:
This store carries Mitoku’s full line. Mitoku’s full inventory of products available online

Enjoy! More next week. Have a safe and happy holiday!
Best to all — Em

P.S. Please share this with your favorite social media site. To read more articles, please use the Title Archive tab on the upper navigation bar. Please subscribe to my blog on the right side-bar.

(c)2009 Em at http://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com
If you desire to use or quote more than a couple of sentences from my article, please write for permission to the About Me page on the upper navigation bar. Please include the address of the site where you wish to use it. Thanks!

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

If I just had a chance to grab 3 or 4 supplements in an emergency, to help keep my Health and to prolong my life, Iodine containing foods would be one of them (or a special supplement, I mention in the prior articles below). Yes, Iodine is that important.

Iodine is especially essential for diabetics. Indeed, it is essential for everyone, as most people are definitely deficient.

Read my first two articles  so you can be up to speed on the “why” of Iodine.

Iodine and Health for Everyone – Part 1

Iodine and Health – Part 2

Now that you’ve done that reading, let’s continue with some ways to use seaweeds, the most iodine-rich, alkaline food.

___ I use powdered Kombu seaweed to make soups with a creamy-rich texture without the dairy or less-nutritious thickeners. I sprinkle it in stews to make a thicker, more nutritious sauce than flour, arrowroot or cornstarch would give. Ditto for salad dressing. I sneak it into baked goods or pancakes. Luckily, Iodine is not harmed by heat. I use it as a topper for rice, along with other choices. It has a pleasant sea flavor which is not aggressive or strange. Use it to substitute for salt in any savory smoothie. Sneak a little into some other smoothies. Add some to pickled foods. You have to be inventive as most modern western cookbooks won’t have seaweed recipes.

___ I use a lot of Japanese recipes. Their cooks are the masters of seaweed cuisine, and it goes way beyond just wraps for sushi. You’ll also find recipes in Welsh books (as laver), in Macrobiotic cookbooks and in many other cuisines on a varying scale. In these recipes, I use the real sheets of seaweed.

___ You can also make your own version of Gomashio, a shelf stable condiment using Celtic sea salt and organic ingredients.

Seaweed has virtually no calories, is rich in fiber as well as Iodine and it has just about every needed trace mineral known to humankind.

Here is an adaptable recipe.
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Em’s Kaisou Salada Serves 4

Make ahead:
5 grams ( 1/8 oz.) EACH dried wakame, dried arame and dried hijiki seaweeds I use only Eden Foods brand, as they source their organic seaweeds carefully.

1) In two separate bowls, soak the arame and hijiki together for 30 minutes, and in the other bowl, soak the wakame for 10 minutes.

130 grams (4 ozs.) enokitake mushrooms (tiny white mushrooms with long stems — in good supermarkets refrigerated or Asian produce section) (optional)

2) Trim the hard stems off each bunch of mushroom stalks, divide the bundles, keeping the mushrooms intact and whole.

2 scallions (spring onions, green onions) and ice water with cubes

3) Cut the onions into 1 1/2″ long thin strips and plunge into the ice water so they curl up.

1/2 English cucumber, cut lengthwise, cut into thin, half-moon slices

1 bunch of red radishes, washed and sized as desired. (Also, wash the leaves and dry them. Use for soups or stir frys.) OR use a desired amount of white icicle (daikon) radish

4) Cook the wakame and enokitake mushrooms in boiling water for 2 minutes. Add the arame and hijiki for a few seconds and immediately remove from the heat and then drain.

5) Transfer to a bowl. Sprinkle on marinade from 1 1/4 teaspoon of Celtic sea salt and 15 ml (1 Tablespoon) organic brown rice vinegar while the weeds and mushroom mix is still warm. Then, chill everything in the refrigerator.

Salad Assembling:

Make the salad Dressing:
60 ml (4 Tablespoons) organic brown rice vinegar
7.5 ml (1 1/2 teaspoons) organic toasted sesame oil
15 ml (1 Tablespoon) organic shoyu or tamari soy sauce
1 Tablespoon water (with a pinch of dashi-no-moto powder, if desired)
2.5cm (1 inch) piece of fresh ginger root, finely grated (or slivered)

1 package fresh washed organic Mesclun mixed spring greens
organic sesame seeds and // or organic hemp seeds

1) Place greens in a large bowl, add cucumber and radish slices, then top with the seaweed-enokitake mixture. Garnish with the spring onion curls and the seeds and then serve each portion with some dressing, just before eating.

Additional Options:
___ 12 cooked tiger prawns, cooled
___ 4 – 6ozs. of steamed, then cooled cold-water, ocean fish fillet, per person e.g. cod, halibut, sardines, Atlantic pollock, haddock.
___ up to 1 1/2 teaspoons of superfine sugar or equal amount of low glycemic agave nectar to the salad dressing
___ add lightly steamed carrot slices or fully steamed sweet potato cubes
___ fresh dill or fresh cilantro (for detoxification and flavor)

Enjoy!
====================================================================
This is delightful pH alkaline food.

Best to all — Em

P.S. Please share this with your favorite social media site. To read more articles, please use the Title Archive tab on the upper navigation bar. Please subscribe to my blog on the right side-bar.

(c)2009 Em at http://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com
If you desire to use or quote more than a couple of sentences from my article, please write for permission to the About Me page on the upper navigation bar. Please include the address of the site where you wish to use it. Thanks!

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

(c)2009 Em at http://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com Spring Green Kefir Soup (c)2009 Em at http://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com Swirling Gazpacho Kefir Soup

“Listen-up!” diabetics, pregnant Moms, breast-feeding Moms, overweight people,  pre-diabetics and those with digestive troubles — go out to the health food store or supermarket and get some plain kefir, now! You’re about to learn about a food which can change your life (or your baby’s life!).

You’ll be able to use the kefir you purchase in a recipe or two below, by the end of the weekend, and get yourself going on a better path to Health.

Firstly, a quick overview and a reminder to read last week’s post (if you haven’t already). Kefir is a cultured milk product, more beneficial than yoghurt because of the microflora strains it contains (some products have 7 – 10 strains, whereas yoghurt usually only includes 2 families).

Probiotic bacteria are important because these microflora make critical products for your immune system and nutritional well-being. Different strains make and behave differently.

Normally, you have about 300 different strains of bacteria in your gut, and those double in number one or two times a day. About 10 – 12 pounds of your body weight is this intestinal colony! If you are healthy, most of your colony consists of healthy families but, if you are unwell, then more of your colony is bad-guy types. They may or may not be ones to kill you, but they will age you or make you ill.

As diabetics are starving for nutrition (much of your nutrient reservoir is robbed by extra urination and lack of enzymes), and as all babies’ guts are sterile when born (and must be populated by “seeding” through the mother’s milk), having the right probiotic bacteria, in the right ratios is critical. Probiotic foods can populate your gut with the friendlies you require.

Mom’s have only about a 2 – 3 month window to largely determine their child’s intestinal profile for life. The intestinal bacteria blueprint ratio is almost as individual as finger-prints, and is remarkably stable unless you know you must change it and work to do so.

Reasons you might need to help: if you become seriously or chronically ill or chronically stressed (then self-regulation tends to break down — as it does when you eat poorly, too).

The Ayurvedic medical texts of 5,000 – 6,000 years ago already tell of the benefits of fermented milk saying that ‘fermented milk leads to a long and healthy life’!  Pliny, the Roman historian writes in 76CE that he was treating gastro-intestinal infections with fermented milk.

Now, when I say “fermented” milk, this is a very specific,  purposeful, cleanly-cultured food product, not just some left-over or random happenstance.

These properly fermented, pro-biotic foods — slow fermented sauerkraut (usually not made commercially *), natto, miso, tempeh, slow fermented pickles *, kim chee, yoghurt, kefir, lait ribot (from Brittany, in France, which uses buttermilk, rather than whole milk) — provide beneficial bacteria to keep your body healthy in many, many ways which we’ll learn here, over time and several articles.

All of these are traditional foods e.g. lait ribot has been made in Brittany for thousands of years, well back into the time when it was made there by tribes of Gauls.

It is important to eat these foods in ways which keep the beneficial bacteria alive, as they run the gauntlet of  dashing through your stomach acid, by potent bile and much more, to hopefully arrive, safe and secure (and still in large numbers) to make a home in your small intestine, daily.

Like any other living organisms, the friendly microflora are killed by freezing and boiling and oven temperatures, so even though there are lots of recipes for ice-cream, soups and muffins etc. etc. understand you are compromising getting live inoculations to boost your intestinal colonies, if you use those cooking methods.

However, if you use kefir in these types of recipes, the product will still be superior to using plain milks, as the friendlies have already increased the actual nutrition in the milk, while they were alive, even if you kill them later.

I prefer to try to walk the middle path, and use my kefir cold from the refrigerator. So the recipes I feature in the photos above are cold soups. The middle-ground for ice-cream and parfaits, is keep it soft and not really as ice-cream, if you want to keep some of the friendly bacteria alive. Adding and pureeing some frozen berries goes a long way to accomplishing that, rather than putting the kefir in the freezer.

Kefir is likely a Turkhish word derived from “keif” meaning “good-feeling”. Kefir is pronounced “k’feer” but many mispronounce it as “kee-fur”.

Using a purchased culture of “kefir grains”, it can be made from many types of milk, as well as super-healthy young coconut water (and an Australian has even made a water version that behaves like a healthy “champagne”).

But, kefir must be made by the actual grains, which are removed and re-used, so you cannot use a commercial kefir as a “starter” the way you can with yoghurt, as the dairies removed the grains of kefir before they bottled it.

The first site I remember coming across about kefir was probably Dom’s when he started in about 1999. You can still learn more there than just about anywhere else. The reference is below. Starters are available from Donna Gates, at bodyecology.com

More on kefir and probiotics — how they help; why you need them; how they can retrieve your health will continue next time. Meanwhile, here’s a quick cold soup – two versions.

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Em’s Spring Green Kefir Soup

In a blender or food processor:

2 English cucumbers – washed and chunked

1/3 – 1/2 small yellow onion, peeled and washed

3 medium size garlic cloves, sliced somewhat

2 giant pinches of rough-chopped fresh dill (tops and stems)

Blend all of these ingredients — taste. Add more onion or garlic if needed. It’s impossible to say how much as some onions are very raucous (but the strong flavor comes from sulfur, which is why they are healthy!). The same is true about garlic. You can always add more, but having too much at first is almost impossible to undo.

After you decide if you want to add some sea salt and / or some cayenne pepper, you are now ready to add the kefir.

1 quart plain kefir

Combine gently, without using the blender … remember, we’re trying to keep these helpful little-guys alive!

Serve immediately with a dash of chives.     Makes about 2 quarts.

VARIATION:Swirling Gazpacho Kefir Soup

for every portion of Spring Green Kefir Soup, add half again as much organic tomato juice, just into the center of the green soup. Gently swirl.

For example: 8 oz. green soup + 4 oz. tomato juice.

You can also add a dash of Worcestershire sauce and an 1/16t of Bragg’s apple cider vinegar or lemon juice, if you find the need. It will be more like a Bloody Mary, then!

Why I used these ingredients and how they’ll help you:

The cucumbers help alkalize your tissues.

The onions provide sulfur to make potent detoxifiers.

The garlic is a natural anti-viral and anti-bacterial, if it is raw.

The dill is for flavor and the B vitamins all green leafies have.

The sea salt will alkalize. (Do NOT use regular table salt!!!)

The cayenne is important for your heart and circulation.

The kefir will provide all the probiotic, live, friendly bacteria families.

The tomato juice will provide other anti-oxidants, especially helpful ones for eyes.

If used, the Bragg’s apple cider vinegar (or Spectrum — only those brands) will alkalize (yes, you read that right. I leaves alkaline ash, after metabolism.)

The lemon juice will alkalize (yes, it’s citric acid, but as note above, for metabolic ash).

Worcestershire sauce is just for flavor, put if you use an Asian Fish sauce, instead, you will get some beneficial enzymes, if it has not been overly processed.

=======================================================================================

Experiment with smoothies, but, again, whirl everything before you add the kefir, as much as possible. Some great smoothie recipes – Dom’s

NOTES:

Read last week’s Introduction to Kefir and to bowel health and to the opinions of Dr. Mercola and Dr. Ron Rosedale

* In America and Canada, Bubbe’s Brand is properly slow-fermented and available in many health stores and some supermarkets.

And, CultureBiota is an artisanal food maker in Portland, Oregon with the same kinds of slow probiotic products, truly traditional foods. Health stores will generally have healthier and organic forms of the Asian foods, but check out Asian groceries, too, for miso, tempeh and natto, as well as kim chee.

Preferably, consider Nancy’s brand of kefir, as it is made with milk from grass-fed cows and uses low-glycemic agave for sweetener.

Note, kefir has a very mild laxative property, which many people need.

You should definitely include kefir as part of the regimen when taking anti-biotics and for up to a couple of months after them.

Naturopathic physicians recommend kefir over yoghurt for those with digestive problems because kefir has very low curd tension, which makes ir very digestible.

Kefir has the potential to be a potent help in cancer prevention due to its high concentration of lactic acid.

LINKS:
Use for starter culture source for kefir grains

The most comprehensive kefir site I know – Dom’s

Traditionally fermented foods – CultureBiota

(c)2009 Em http://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please write for my permission to quote from or use my article. Thanks for respecting my original work and copyright.

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

Yes, the economy is tough, but you can’t let your Health suffer! So, here’s a  recipe that has high nutrition and is reasonably priced — using fresh foods and stable, multi-use pantry items.

This is from my really adventurous friend, Meg, who is a great cook, too!

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Meg’s Asian Slaw

copyright 2009 Em http://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com Meg's Asian Slaw
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For the salad vegetables:

1 package (12 oz) Coleslaw Mix – green and red cabbage  and carrot –  all shredded

1 baby bok choy, leaves julienned and stalk diced finely or shredded

1C pea shoots, washed and shaken dry, then chopped *

1 yellow mango (preferred)  or regular type – washed, peeled and diced small

For Dressing:

3T warm water

3T agave nectar sytup

3T lemon juice

3T Asian fish sauce (Thai = Nam Pla)

1 clove garlic, smashed and chopped

1 – 2 t red pepper flakes

1T organic sesame oil

Dissolve eveything in warm water.

Topping:

2 oz. per person canned  skinless salmon (preferably wild-caught, from Trader Joe’s)

OR

2 oz. per person tuna (can only use 2x a month and once a month for kids, and none for lactating or pregnant women — due to mercury levels)

AND

optional – add avocado cubes tossed in lemon juice, especially for vegetarians

Toss all the veggies together, and moisten well with dressing. Keep the fish separate and give each person their 2oz. as an estimate of the whole. Place fish on top or mix in.

Serve. Make sure the fish sauce and sesame oil are returned to the refrigerator once opened.

* pea shoots can be purchased at good Asian groceries. You can substitute any other sprouts, but pea shoots are relatively inexpensive.

Serves 4 – as a light meal

Add more, different veggies (or double the same ones) and double the dressing if you need more portions. It will work well for left-overs, too, for a couple of days in the refrigerator. It doesn’t just wilt, eventhough it’s already been dressed, in fact it tasted even better the next day.

==================================================================

Notes about the ingredients:

Agave – a low glycemic, natural sweetener  (doesn’t make blood sugar rise).

Lemon juice – Vitamin C source and an alkalizing food.

Fish Sauce – fermented anchovy base, and has many nutritious enzymes. Used for thousands of years in Asia and in Roman times. No fish is actually eaten, just the liquid rich in enzymes.

Garlic – anti-bacterial, anti-viral, blood-thinner – if fresh.

Hot red pepper flakes - stimulates metabolism.

Sesame Oil – an Omega-6 oil, so use with caution (there’s already way too many Omega-6s in usual diets), but in this dish, we are getting Omega-3’s to balance it (from the fish and avocado), so enjoy the great flavor.

You could also sprinkle the salad with white (and black) sesame seed — which are very high in calcium, if you grind them.

OTHER seeds: you could add more protein with hemp seeds or ground flax seeds, too.

Cabbages – red has lots more anti-oxidants. I like deep green savoy cabbage too, but it’s not in the mixes and has a short season. Cabbage can be used moderately, as it tends to depress the thyroid (and therefore metabolism), but we speeded metabolism with red pepper to offset some of this. Cabbages are very nutritious — good, inexpensive vitamin C source in winter. Cabbages are also helpful to your liver, and aid detoxification.

Baby Bok Choy – a deep green leafy vegetable with more of the goodness only deep green leafies have. Same botanical family as cabbages, so those benefits, yet again.

Carrots – Beta-carotene source to help eyesight. All diabetics need to protect their eyes. This will be made into Vitamin A in your body.

Mango – the yellow ones are more tart. The globular ones have more sweetness. I used the tart one, for glycemic reasons and flavor balance, but either is OK, and the red-yellow globular ones are easier to find. Mango is a great help to digestion (adding more important enzymes)  and it adds more beta-carotene to turn into Vitamin A, as there aren’t as many carrots as I’d like in these coleslaw mixes.

Pea Shoots or Sprouts – incredible nutrition powerhouses, especially for enzymes, but also all vitamins and many minerals.

Fish – brain food from Omega-3s (and they also help many other body parts). Use tuna very infrequently, as noted above, due to high levels of mercury. If canned salmon is too expensive for you, then use canned mackerel, which is high high Omega-3 fish which is very inexpensive.

Avocado – optional – great value. High in healthy Omega-3 fats, for vegetarians.

This recipe will help with detoxification as you will learn when you see another version of an Asian Cabbage Slaw from Dr. Andrew Weil, MD at:

http://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com/2009/01/15/diabetics-detox-your-liver-part-1/

This recipe is easy to prepare and even though 2 ounces of animal protein may not sound like much, you have to remember that all fruits and vegetables and seeds (and nuts) have protein, too. How do you think the largest animals on earth exist as vegetarians!

This is a perfect recipe to get your children involved in helping in the kitchen and if you pair this up with a movie your teens will like,  later, then hopefully you can make some good quality family time making the food, sitting to talk at the table and then watching the movie. It’s important for kids of all ages to learn about the nutrition of their food as well as how to make food. Pre-diabetes is rampant in kids and even more so in teens. You have to be the teacher here!

And, this is a great diabetic recipe to take for lunch at work, too. Fill up on the healthy veggies and with a no-mayo based dressing, this is a lot safer to take with you, as the weather warms.

Fill up on a wide variety of veggies – aim for at least 16 different kinds a day, like the Japanese do. Most Americans don’t even get the 5 the government is encouraging. Is it any wonder so many people are ill?

Well, when you may lose your job or health insurance or you already have, then the best thing to do is put your money into healthy food. If you can better your Health, or at least maintain it, that’s the BEST thing you can do! I speak from experience on that.

You have to be bold in Life! Take control of your own destiny as much as possible. Be independent. Most importantly, think independently. I wanted also to acknowledge and honor the great rebirth and growth of Mandi’s independence on “The Biggest Loser”. She shows that each of us can find the will to endure, at whatever challenge faces us. Use the tools you have at your disposal, and make yourself a winner, in all that matters to you most.

Best to all — Em

Please share this with your favorite Web 2.0 site.

Please read more in the Title Archive on the uopper naviagation bar.

You can subscribe to my blog’s RSS feeds on the side-bar and get automatically updated when I post (usually once a week).

Thanks for the words of encouragement from several of you have written to me at About Me.   And, there are a couple of people I need to respond to. Will try to soon.

(c)2009 Em http://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

If you would like to share my article or quote from it, please respect my copyright and include my copyright citation and website address in your footnotes or reference section. Thanks!

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