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Archive for the ‘ecological concerns’ Category

“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

Moving along as the year accelerates; Halloween blends into Diwali, Thanksgiving and all the end of the year holidays – Hannukah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, New Year’s.  This is when people are often ready to try new foods and recipes and want to look and feel their best. So, it’s a good impetus for change. Use it!

Last time, I shared the “Dirtiest Foods” according to Environmental Working Group, a famous ecology watch-dog. This week, I want to share the Best, Cleanest Foods for Americans. The EWG has that list ready, too. Obviously, it’s best to save your food dollars to buy Organic to avoid the dirty foods, and in many cases, it’s relatively “safe” to eat conventionally-grown foods in this cleanest group, as factory agriculture doesn’t use pesticides on these plants as much, or in some cases, even at all.

Just remember:  “S/He who takes medicine and neglects diet wastes the skill of his doctors.” (Chinese Proverb)

And, while we’re at it, I want to tell you about another important watch-dog group which I hope you will support: the Cornucopia Institute.

Here’s the Cornucopia Institute’s chart showing which formerly “truly organic” brands have been acquired by Big Business – many times totally compromising the organics of the product. http://www.cornucopia.org/wp-content/themes/Cornucopia/downloads/OrganicT30J09.pdf

More links to help you make knowledgeable food choices and purchases at: http://www.cornucopia.org/who-owns-organic/

This is important, especially if you have already been buying organic brands for a long time. These business acquisitions are not mainstream knowledge, and, for example, when Kellogg’s bought Kashi, few of realized that Kellogg’s started using 100% GMO (genetically-modified organisms) in the grains used in Kashi! That’s NOT what I was buying Kashi for!  Cornucopia Institute alerted me to that.

The EWG also publishes a list of the 15 fruits and vegetables that are fine to eat when conventionally-grown. This is because the edible portions are protected by sturdy husks, hulls, and rind. These are generally not grown with systemic pesticides (as strawberries are). Here are their current picks…

Here’s the EWG “The Clean 15” List, with my comments:

1. Onions – this vegetable family, which also includes leeks, spring onions (scallions), shallots, ramps and garlic are all very healthy, mostly due to their sulfur component. Sulfur is a vital mineral and is deeply involved in your biochemistry. These compounds are best found in fresh onions and fresh garlic, so try to keep some of your allium-family veggies in raw state in pickles, sandwiches, burgers, salsas, spreads, hummus, cold soups (like gazpacho) etc., Let fresh garlic cloves get minced and then sit for 5 minutes in the air to “activate” the important heart-healthy and anti-biotic components before combining it with other foods.

2. Corn – GMO corn is rampant in our society. This Genetically-Modified corn is to be avoided, period, regardless of how it was grown. As far as “regular” corn, it is still a poor food. It is also a very high-carb food, which is largely best avoided.

3. Pineapple – this fruit is rich in Bromelain, a compound which helps digestion and also helps with pain and inflammation issues. Fresh pineapple is completely different from canned. Please do not use cooked fruits! Not only is the goodness compromised in the cooking, but even alkaline fruits become acid pH when cooked. Health depends on alkalinity, so keep your fruits fresh.

4. Avocado – the heavy skin on avocado protects it from the usual environmental toxins, so buying “regular” ones is OK if that helps your budget. Be sure to include avocados as they have some of the healthiest fats on the planet. If you have a latex allergy, consult with your allergist as to whether avocados and bananas are appropriate as they contain a natural latex.

5. Asparagus – this veggie is a wonderful, natural diuretic, and is a very pH alkaline food. With its short growing season, most of us will be eating frozen asparagus (not canned — which has barely any food value and the can linings of all canned food are suspected as most are BPA). For fresh asparagus, just lightly-steam it or use in stir-fry. Include it as a side or make into a warm or cold salad combined, or not, with other veggies. It combines well with lemon. Do not be surprised if you void more in the bathroom and that you smell asparagus as you do.  This is also a good fiber source.

6. Sweet peas – this is a dense carbohydrate food, so it must be used in moderation. As peas have fiber, you can deduct those carbs from the total carb count. Peas can be eaten raw or steamed and are great in legume salads to provide color and a touch of natural sweetness. They go well with cheese in salads. If you are using the pea pod, then buy organic peas. Peas in their pod make could “dippers” and scoops for healthy bean, cheese or egg spreads. Pea shoots are another option and as with all sprouts, they are endlessly useful, especially in salads and sandwiches. Find the pea sprouts in good health stores or good Asian markets.

7. Mangoes – this is a fabulous fruit, with good fiber profile which helps to deduct from its total carb load. It is very sweet, naturally, so can be used in small amounts to substitute for less healthy sweetners in recipes. It has excellent enzymes, Vitamin A and if used in small amounts, then enjoy!

8. Eggplant – this is a very alkaline vegetable and is evidently less in need of pesticides in facory agriculture. I do not follow the usual instructions to “salt” eggplant to get the bitterness out. These slightly bitter compounds help to keep it alkaline pH. They do not taste bad! If you have rheumatoid arthritis, you probably should avoid all nightshade vegetables, at least for a while. Eggplant, tomatoes, chilis, bell peppers, potatoes (white, red, yellow)  and tomatillos are all nightshades. Eggplantis usually cooked, but it does not have to be fatty like most recipes tell you to do byfrying it. Try it as a dip like Baba Ghanouj, instead.

9. Cantaloupe – I don’t recommend cantaloupe at all. It’s skin is a mold source, even if microscopic. It is impossible to get off all the mold spores in that web of wrinkled skin! You cut the melon and bring the mold to the pieces you eat. Only eat smooth skinned melons. Wash them well, then skin them and eat ALONE with no other kinds of foods (even other fruits) for 20 minutes. They are SO alkaline that nothing else can be digested properly if eaten with them.

10. Kiwi – this little gem is an Omega-3 essential fatty acid source. It originally grows in the coldest part of China and it’s natural anti-freeze provides us Omega-3s, those wonderful sources of heart health also found in the fish from frigid waters, like salmon, cod, herring and more. It’s also a good Vitamin C source. Apart from tasting great, these always look pretty on a plate and are good for young children to eat, too.

11. Cabbage – cabbage is nutritious, but it is problematic if you have thyroid issues. Discuss this with your physician. For others, cabbage and its cousins have less interference because commercial growers cut-off so many of the most nutritious outer leaves. So, yes, commercial cabbage is relatively safe to eat, but I still buy organic cabbage, especially Savoy, to get those precious outer leaves. Even better: grow your own!

12. Watermelon – of all the melons, this is the most healing. It’s bright red color is indicative of even more nutrition than the deep yellows of other melons and even the seeds are nutritious (if broken free of their coat). Just make sure that the skins are washed well before you cut open the melon.But, I still buy organic watermelon (and you must if you are going to process the rind into pickles).

13. Sweet potatoes – these nutritional powerhouses are not potatoes, botanically. They are from a different family, so people with rheumatoid arthritis, who need to avoid the Nightshade vegetable family (includes regular potatoes), should be able to tolerate sweet potatoes. The key for diabetics to use sweet potatoes is to make sure that they are the sweetest thing in  the meal, without adding any extra sweetner. It’s just not needed. And, sweet potatoes can help other things taste sweet, along with stevia, as a safer way to add sweetness, rather than depending on dates, applesauce and other ploys. Stevia and tiny amounts of real, organic maple syrup are the best sweetners for diabetics. Agave, corn syrup, rice syrup, artificial sweetners and honey are not. Organic molasses is possible, in tiny amounts, but I find its flavor is not compatible with much. Yes, I used to recommend agave, but now I know better.

14. Grapefruit – this is one of my favorite fruits, especially Ruby Reds, but many people should not be eating grapefruit because of the medications they take. Confirm if this is an issue for you; ask your pharmacist. Grapefruit is a wonderful alkaline pH fruit, with plenty of Vitamin C and plant anti-osidants. Just remember, people with diabetes should NOT be using fruit juices. Use the whole fruit and be sure to get some of the surrounding white membrane, as that is where other nutrients, like rutin (which helps vascular system) are found. The same membrane qualities are found in other citrus.

15. Mushrooms – this is a problematic food for me as Dr. Robert O. Young, PhD – microbiologist whose pH view of disease and health is valid, I believe, says to avoid fungus. Asians, especially, have many healing mushrooms, so those are the ones I limit myself to. These include: shitake, maitake, reishi and others that a naturopathic or Traditional Chinese Medicine physician will recommend.

I sincerely hope that this list has been helpful. I truly hope that you will support the Cornucopia Institute with its important work. They are presently fighting on behalf of all of us to insure that Big Agribusiness does not water-down the meaning and processes behind the term “organic”. They represented all of us at the USDA National Organics Standards Board meetings recently. Hopefully they were able to prevail.

Please make Organics an integral part of your Health. You can’t spend your money more wisely. Target the foods that need that protection the most, and help your children avoid the chemically-laden food list at all costs. Also, eat in season. This not only helps you spend your food dollar wisely, but helps your body get the foods it expects, instinctively, and that it needs.

Best to all — Em

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar. The extra page links are at the bottom of the first page.

You can also sign-up for email alerts for when I post to this blog. I try for once a week. The form is on the upper right of the side-bar. Thanks.

(c)2011 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

I am trying to catch-up, as lots of things have been happening in my life and I want you well-equipped with information and healthy foods as we transition seasons and head for Holiday Times.

As Food is Your Medicine, it’s important to get the Best! The Environmental Working Group lists the Best and Worst Farmed foods. Here they are for 2011, with my comments.

The new “Dirty Dozen”: Avoid these if conventionally-farmed, at all costs, and for the nutritious foods which you don’t want to miss, then use only the ORGANIC farmed versions.

1. Apples – these fruits are highly nutritious, but they should only be used as a whole, raw, organic fruit. Making them into juice concentrates too much of the large fructose content, and cooking changes the fruit completely (apart from the fact, then when cooked, most people remove the skins). It is only just beneath the skin that the most-healthy nutrient in apples hides. It’s the mineral chromium, which is needed for blood sugar control. If one was eating a totally-natural hunter-gatherer diet, then probably “one apple a day would keep the medicine-wo/man away”. Apple sauce is prolematical being cooked and in the huge portion (meaning equivalence of several apples) which people are likely to give themselves or their children (even worse). Make sure to wait for this year’s Fall Harvest of apples. Those stored in the supermarkets’ coolers are long-since useless.

2. Celery: It’s a sneaky addition to the Bad List. I have a huge celery plant in my back-yard and I see NO reason for it to be pesticided like conventional commercial agriculture does. Celery is the second-ranked dirty food. It’s critical to use organic celery (and only CRISP stalks), as celery helps our bodies relax from tensions and stresses (it’s called a nervine). If the celery goes limp, do NOT use it. Celery should be used raw in salads and the “strings” provide good fiber to slow down other carbs.

3. Strawberries Every kid loves strawberries, so it’s shameful that conventional ones are the 3rd. most dangerous fruit thanks to farming in America. Your country may be different, so check it out!  This berry has lots of anti-oxidants and vitamins, so do buy it, just buy Organic! Figure that unless you buy Organic products, that strawberry ice-cream and strawberry jam will have filthy conventional berries in them. Stupid manufacturers.

4. Peaches: These fruits belong to the same botanical family as apples and plums. They are nutritious but also have a lot of fructose, so should be used sparingly. Fructose is not good for diabetics and everyone is affected by fructose turning-off your satiety signals and piling on belly-fat. Generally, vegetables are MUCH healthier than fruits and fruits should be used in extreme moderation.

5. Spinach: It’s not just the event a few years ago where birds or roaming animals pooping on spinach was not washed-off well enough, causing an E. coli outbreak. That can happen to any raw food. It is your responsibilty as the consumer to make sure that “Triple-washed” spinach (or any thing else) is washed again in your own kitchen. Some leafy greens are harder than others to “wash” commercially. You are the final inspector. Spinach is nutritious enough to bother with this, but as it also has a hefty-dose of oxalic acid, it is not a main-line green. Just add a few extra leaves to your salad made from other greens (like romaine, cilantro, parsley and kale — all of them Organic).

6. Nectarines: Nectarines are a hybrid – a cross between peaches and plums, They have the best-of-both. But, unfortunately, in America, they are pesticided and chemically-fertilized too much. So, buy Organic nectarines, only in season, and get the benefits of a lower fructose fruit (as plums are lower in fructose) with a hint of the higher Peach.

7. Grapes:Don’t get dragged-in to the out-of-season grapes! Most are being farmed in countries which do not have strong laws regarding pesticides! Apart from that, it’s always wiser to eat-in-season. Your body needs different foods in different seasons and expects them to have their nutrients, in the right proportion and form, to carry you through. This is especially true of winter foods, which are denser, with their own array of nutrients. Whereas warm-season foods have much higher water-content to help slake your thirst (and a nutrient profile rich in electrolytes to help compensate for mineral loss when sweating). Just make sure you eat in season. Research the proper season when foods will normally be harvested in your country and region. Organic grapes (especially red ones) are a highly-nutritious food which should be used once every few days, in season, in moderate quantities, as there’s lots of fructose in them, too.

8. Sweet bell peppers: Peppers (hot or sweet), potatoes, tomatoes, tomatillos and cape gooseberry are all part of the nightshade botanical family.  Sweet potatoes are from a different family. Nightshades can cause inflammation and a biochemical cascade resulting in arthritis for some people. They are foods to get off of for up to 6 months and see if you are doing better. If you still want to re-introduce them, do it one by one, at least a week in between each and pay attention to your body’s signals. Make sure any of these foods is always Organic! Peppers have lots of Vitamin C and the red ones have Vitamin A, too. But, you must make sure that any of these foods are not secretly undermining your precious Health.

9. Potatoes: Same as for Peppers, above, along with the fact that potatoes must always be Organic, scrubbed, unpeeled, in small portions (like 1 small to medium potato) and eaten always with a healthy fat in the meal (avocado, organic coconut oil, organic hemp oil, organic olive oil, organic butter, organic ghee).  On their own, potatoes have a very high glycemic index and trigger too much insulin; healthy fats slow them down. Conventional potatoes are also doused in fungicides after harvest, and I am not sure that even peeling them helps you avoid the chemical. And, the most important nutrition is just under the skin, so you would be just getting a big carb load without much nutrition to be peeling them.

10. Blueberries: They are a divine gift — easy to grow, delicious, and most importantly they are highly nutritious, but NOT if conventionally farmed! Only get Organic berries or grow your own, Organically. The plants require very little attention. Eat them raw. You want to get every iota of goodness and cooking always destroys nutrients. Use them in fruit salad, smoothies etc. They are a medium-range fructose fruit.

11. Lettuce:  I suspect that this Warning applies to all commercially-grown conventional lettuce. However, when you buy Organic lettuce, you not only have a safer product, but you will have access to a much-wider choice of green leafies — lettuces and all sorts of other plants — like those in “Spring Mix” etc.  Organic Romaine lettuce is MUCH more nutritionally-sound than any iceberg lettuce (which is a total waste of your hard-earned dollar, as iceberg has almost NO nutrients, at all). Enjoy trying oak-leaf lettuce, frisee, endives, orach, radicchio, and all the other wonderful “greens”.  but only in Organic or non-sprayed form. Leafies are the best source of B vitamins, used to allay stress and also they contain wonderful alkaline minerals you need for bio-electricty and to quell inflammatory chemistry.

12. Kale/collard greens: Kale is SO effective in bringing up the nutrients in the soil that, when it is used in fields which have had toxic and too many pesticides thrown on them, kale is used to “detoxify” the fields (but then those companies still sell the very-toxic, conventional kale!). So, you can only use Organic Kale, for sure! Kale is a nutritonal powerhouse, and if I could only choose one vegetable, this would be it! Those on Coumadin / Warfarin therapy can use it, but it just has to be at a consistent serving and use, so it can be accounted for.

The EWG also publishes a list of the 15 fruits and vegetables that are fine to eat when they are conventionally-grown. I’ll share that with you next time.

Best to all — Em

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar.

You can also sign-up for email alerts for when I post to this blog. I try for once a week. The form is on the upper right of the side-bar. Thanks.

(c)2011 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

The past 4 posts have been laying out the case about why Omega 3 fats are especially essential to fight diabetes and the accompanying physical issues which diabetics often wrestle with. Here’s some more about Omega 3 fish sources as well as  recipes to use as basics, in your kitchen!

For cold-water fish sources of Omega 3s, it’s important to know the “provenance” of the fish (i.e. what exact species and where they were fished).

Most lists just say Omega 3 sources are ‘cold water fish’. Sometimes they mention species (like “cod”, “salmon” etc.), but this is NOT good enough!

If we are to protect the oceans and ourselves, we must know more and then act to “preserve the natural fishery” and eat clean, pristine fish!

Here’s some more complete information about these “cold-water” fish and keep yourself updated at the Environmental Defense Fund site and Monterey Bay Aquarium “Seafood Watch” site!

Cold-water Omega-3 species to be AVOIDED are:

___   Atlantic cod – due to overfishing

___   Pacific cod (from imported sources) – poor product, bad environment

___  farmed salmon, from anywhere! same as above for cod

Cold-water Omega-3 speciesBest Choices are:

___   Arctic Char – farmed in fast, natural streams, in America and Norway and in cleaned recirculating closed systems. Also called Iwana and Alpine Char

___   Pacific cod – farmed US west coast – fished using bottom long-line technique or trap or hook-and-line, only

___   Pacific halibut, caught US waters

___   Sablefish / Black cod – wild, Alaska and British Columbia; California, Oregon and Washington have an Acceptable rating for the sustenance of the fishery. They are second choice. Sablefish should also be used to substitute for “Unagi”, freshwater eel, in sushi and other Japanese recipes, as Unagi is in jeopardy. Season: fresh is May – October. Frozen, all year.

___   Salmon – wild, Alaska

___   Pacific sardines, US waters only

___   Rainbow trout – farmed in US, only

Acceptable for the moment:

___   Alaska pollock as fish, not when processed as fake krab, surimi etc.

___   Salmon, wild – from north of Cape Falcon, Oregon (but Washington catch is high in mercury – so don’t eat often — none of this Washington state catch is for kids or if pregnant).

Here are a few special recipes from Monterey Bay Aquarium species which are sustainable and responsibly produced and harvested.

Find out about the status of the fisheries in your nation. The statements above are from the US, but highlight that there definitely are problems in parts of the world, especially where fish are being farmed or where there are little or no laws about pollution.

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Arctic Char, like Trout, is a cousin of Salmon. As such all sub-species have great Omega-3 profiles. Feel free to use them all year. Whole Foods and good health stores will carry it. Ask the fishmonger in your regular supermarket if they can order it, too.

ARCTIC  CHAR WITH FENNEL AND ORANGE

Serves: 4

4 med fennel bulbs, trimmed, cut lengthwise into 1-inch wide wedges, some fronds minced and reserved for garnish
2 lg red onions, peeled, cut through the stem end into 1-inch wide wedges
2 T olive oil, plus more as needed
4 t grated orange zest (from about 3 oranges), divided
1¾ t fennel seeds, crushed coarsely in mortar with pestle if desired, divided
coarse kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
4 Arctic char fillets, 5-6 ounces each
1/4 C balsamic vinegar
1/4 C fresh orange juice
2 t firmly packed brown sugar

Arrange one rack in the upper third of your oven and one rack in the lower third of the oven, then preheat to 450º F.

Combine the fennel wedges and onions in a large bowl, and then add the 2 tablespoons of the oil, 1 1/2 teaspoons of the orange zest, and 1 teaspoon of the fennel seeds. Toss to coat the vegetables. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and toss again.

Arrange vegetables in a single layer on a large, rimmed baking sheet, then place on the upper oven rack. Roast for 15 minutes.

Stir the vegetables and continue roasting until tender and beginning to brown, which will be about 15 minutes longer.

In the meantime, brush a small, rimmed baking sheet with olive oil. Also brush the skin of the fish with olive oil. Place skin side down on the prepared baking sheet. Brush on more olive oil to the  top of the fish and sprinkle with salt, pepper, 1 1/2 teaspoons of the orange zest and remaining ¾ teaspoon of fennel seeds.

After the vegetables have roasted for 20 minutes, place the pan with the fish on the lower oven rack and cook the fish until it feels springy when pressed in the center. This will take  about 8-10 minutes, depending on the thickness of the fish.

Another test of doneness: make a small incision in the thickest part of the fish. The flesh should be just opaque in the center. If it’s still translucent, then cook it a few minutes longer.

While the fish is cooking, mix the vinegar, orange juice, brown sugar and remaining 1 teaspoon grated orange zest in a large skillet. Stir until the sugar dissolves, and then simmer over medium heat until thickened to a syrupy texture.  Stir it frequently, for about 3 minutes, then remove from the heat.

Divide the vegetables and fish among 4 pre-warmed plates, saving the juices from the fish pan. Next, stir 3-4 teaspoons of the fish juices into the balsamic sauce. Spoon all of the sauce over the fish and vegetables. Sprinkle lightly with chopped fennel fronds and serve immediately.

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PACIFIC COD CHOWDER

Serves: 4

4  slices applewood-smoked “bacon” (1/4 pound), chopped (optional)*
1 lg onion, chopped
2 bay leaves
1 t minced fresh thyme
1/4 t paprika
(3) 8-ounce bottles clam juice OR fish broth
1/2 C spring or filtered water
1 pound organic Yukon gold potatoes, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch pieces **
1/2 C  organic whipping cream **
coarse kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
1 1/2 pounds Pacific cod, cut in 1-inch pieces
1 med bunch organic kale finely chopped (about 2 cups) **

If using, cook the “bacon” in a heavy large pot over medium heat until brown and crisp, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the bacon to a paper towel and drain.

Add the onion, bay leaves and thyme to the pot. Sauté over medium heat until the onion is tender, about 5 minutes. Stir in the paprika. Add the clam juice or broth, 1/2 cup water and then the potatoes. Bring the mixture to a low boil. Reduce heat to medium, cover and simmer until the potatoes are just tender, about 8 minutes.

Next, add the cream and bacon to the chowder. Sprinkle the cod pieces with salt and pepper then add the cod and kale to the soup. Simmer until the fish is opaque in the center (to check, cut into a piece of fish with a small knife or break apart with a spoon), stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes.

Only after you are sure that the fish IS cooked, then taste and adjust the seasonings. Ladle the chowder into warmed bowls and serve.

NOTES:
* It’s optional to use “bacon” of any sort. Frankly, it just overwhelms the taste of the fish! But, if you want a vegetarian version, then use a soy “bacon” substitute. It gives a little flavor without being overwhelming, and it keeps the dish kosher, too.

** These 2 vegetables and the cream MUST BE ORGANIC! Why?

Regular potatoes are covered in fungicides.

Regular kale is often grown in polluted fields to draw-out the pollutants!

All fatty dairy products harbor environmental toxins unless they are organically-produced, with care.

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PACIFIC COD TACOS

I personally feel that the Fish Taco is Mexico’s greatest contribution to world-cuisine. I know there are other great Mexican meals, like adobos etc., but this is MY favorite!  Taco del Mar, si!

Serves: 4

Marinated Cod

1/4 C T  olive oil
2 T chopped fresh cilantro
1 1/2 T  fresh lemon juice
1 t  ground achiote* (ground annatto seed) (optional)
1 garlic clove, crushed
1 1/4-1 1/2 pounds Pacific cod

Cumin-Lime Aioli

1/2 C organic  mayonnaise
2 T  cold-pressed, extra-virgin olive oil
1 small garlic clove, finely chopped
1 1/2 T  fresh lemon juice
1 T  fresh lime juice
1/2 t ground cumin
1/4 t  ground coriander
1/4 t  cayenne pepper
pinch of white pepper or freshly ground black pepper
coarse Celtic sea salt

Pico de Gallo

2 med. organic red tomatoes seeded, diced
1 med. organic yellow tomato, diced
1 sm.    red onion, finely chopped
1/3 C  chopped fresh cilantro
2 T  fresh lime juice
2 T  fresh lemon juice
1 T  cold-pressed, extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 jalapeño chile, minced
4 shakes hot pepper sauce (such as Tabasco)

1/2 sm.  head organic red cabbage
8-12 organic corn tortillas
olive oil (for frying)
all-purpose flour

Cooking the Marinated Cod

Combine the oil, cilantro, lemon juice, (achiote) and garlic in a medium bowl. Cut the cod lengthwise into 3 x ¾- inch strips. Add to the marinade and stir to coat. Cover and refrigerate at least 1 hour and up to 2 hours.

Making the Aioli

Combine the mayonnaise, oil, garlic, lemon juice, lime juice, cumin, coriander, cayenne and pepper in a medium bowl and mix to blend. Season to taste with salt. (Can be prepared 2 days ahead; cover and refrigerate.)

For the Pico de Gallo

Combine the red and yellow tomatoes, onion, cilantro, lime juice, lemon juice, olive oil, jalapeno and hot pepper sauce in a medium bowl. Mix to blend. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Cut the cabbage half in thirds through the core. Slice very thinly or shred on a v-slicer or a mandolin.

Warm the tortillas in the oven or on top of the stove.

To warm in the oven, preheat to 250º F. Wrap the tortillas in foil and heat in the oven while cooking the cod.

To heat on top of the stove, working with one tortilla at a time, place directly on a gas burner or hot, dry skillet and cook until beginning to brown in spots, about 20 seconds on each side. Wrap in foil to keep warm.

To Cook the Cod:

Cover the bottom of a heavy large skillet generously with olive oil and warm over medium-high heat.

Place some flour on a medium plate. Working in batches, remove the cod from the marinade, turn in the flour to coat, and add to the skillet (do not crowd).

Cook the cod until crisp, beginning to flake, and opaque in the center, about 3 minutes on each side. (The fish will start to separate into opaque flakes when it’s cooked through.)

Transfer to paper towels and drain. If the browned bits in the skillet become dark brown, pour off the oil, wipe out the skillet and add fresh oil. Sprinkle the cooked cod with salt and pepper.

Arrange 2 or 3 warm tortillas on each plate. Spread each with a little aioli and arrange fish strips in the center. Using a slotted spoon, dress with pico de gallo and top with shredded cabbage. Serve immediately.

*Ground achiote, also called ground annatto seed, is a deep red powder that gives the cod a rich, warm color. It can be found in Latin American, Indian and specialty food stores. Turmeric could also be used and it has real nutritional value as an anti-inflammatory.

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SABLEFISH – GENMAI CHA TEA SOUP

Makes 4 servings
Total Time: 65 minutes

2 C  short-grain organic brown rice
1 t Celtic sea salt, divided
1 package (about 0.8 oz.) toasted, seasoned nori seaweed*
2 green onions
2 t  organic oil
1 pound black cod (about 2 fillets) **
8 tea bags of genmaicha ***
4 C filtered water or spring water
8 more Cups – filtered water
1 t  black sesame seeds (white are 2nd choice)
tamari (a rich, traditionally-made Japanese soy sauce)(optional)
toasted sesame oil

In a medium saucepan, bring rice, 1/2 tsp. salt and 4 cups water to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to a simmer, and cook until rice is tender to the bite, about 50 minutes — or use a rice cooker using their proportions for the amount of water needed for 2C rice (dry). Remove rice from heat, uncover, and fluff with a fork.

Meanwhile, cut nori into 1/4-inch strips and set aside. Slice green onions crosswise (including green parts) and set aside.

Preheat broiler.

Rub a baking sheet with oil.

Put fish on sheet and turn over to oil both sides. Sprinkle with remaining 1/2 tsp. salt. Broil 3 to 4 inches away from broiler until cooked through (flesh flakes easily and is opaque in the center), about 5 minutes. Transfer fish to a plate and set aside.

When rice is cooked, bring 8 cups water to a boil in a saucepan. In a large teapot, measuring cup, or pitcher, pour the boiling water over tea bags. Let steep 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, put 1 cup rice in each of 4 large soup bowls. Place 1/2 fish fillet on each bed of rice. Pour 2 cups hot tea over each. Sprinkle with green onion and black sesame seeds. Serve immediately, with bowls of nori, tamari, and sesame oil on the side.

* Nori is the green-black seaweed used to wrap sushi rolls. It is easy to cut into strips with kitchen shears. Nori, tamari and sesame oil will all be available in a good health store.

** try to choose fillets of even thickness.

*** Genmai Cha comes in boxes in Asian (especially Japanese) markets. It is a green tea paired with roasted rice grains. It has a delicate, nutty flavor.

============================================================
REFERENCE WITH RECIPES:
Omega 3 for Diabetics – Part 1
Omega 3 Foods for Diabetics – Part 2
Diabetics Need Omega 3 – Part 3
Omega 3 Helps Diabetes – Part 4

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar. The extra page links are at the bottom of the first page.

You can also sign-up for email alerts for when I post to this blog. I try for once a week. The form is on the upper right of the side-bar. Thanks.

(c)2011 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!”(TM)

This information is SO important for everyone, especially diabetics, that I have made it a 4-part series and have included more recipes for this “new” food, than I have ever incorporated in my articles before. Yes, you need to pay attention. This is about a Foundational Food, basic for Health. Period.

In fact, hemp, like coconuts,  is one of the earliest foods to be used by humans, and hemp seeds, which have a rich nutty flavor,  have long been recognized as an excellent source of energy, as well as nutrition.

Hemp is found all over. It may even be growing wild in your yard, especially if you have a rural property. In America, in colonial times, the government forced farmers to grow hemp. It was that important!

Now, let’s not get confused. Industrial hemp (food-grade hemp) is NOT the plant which produces marijuana (and using hemp as food will not affect drug-testing). The two plants are in the same botanical family, but that’s it. You can’t get “high” on food-grade hempseed and its products. But, how does this plant help you?

Hemp is one of the best sources of essential Omega-3 fats which you must eat everyday. You cannot make these important nutrients inside your body, and they are woefully lacking in most people’s diets today, with big-time consequences!

In the other parts of this series, I’ve talked about other food sources, but in these last articles, most of the space is reserved for recipes which I hope you will use as standards in your everyday cooking — replacing the less nutritious ones you use now.

Getting more Omega-3s in your diet is critical for everyone, especially as the ordinary diet produces a severe imbalance with Omega-6 essential fatty acids.

We are trying to reBalance this and correct the ills that too many Omega-6s cause. (Of course you NEED essential Omega-6s, just not SO much as most people get.)

Famed lipids expert, Udo Erasmus, has an oil blend with the correct balance sold as Udo’s Oil (TM) 3-6-9 Blend. It is vegetarian, organic, sustainable, made in the strictest conditions to protect the delicate natures of these precious oils. Learn to use it as the main basis for your needs, OR, as I do, make sure you get at least the best Omega-3 hemp oils (I like that Nutiva’s comes in a dark, GLASS bottle). The rest come in opaque plastic (no BPA).

As best-practice, all of these oils must be used cold, no cooking, and kept in the refrigerator.

The ideal balance is twice as many Omega-3s as Omega-6s. Both of these precious oils are the main structural component of EVERY cell membrane. They are vitally necessary to regulate cell activity, as well as for cell growth and proper cell division.

In addition to building your brain (they are the most important building-block; 70+% of your brain needs to be Omega-3s), having the proper balance of Omega-3s and -6s will also help you:

___   sleep

___   fight inflammation

___   retain  memory skills

___   regain or sustain joint movement and flexibility

___   succeed in increasing muscle and cardio-vascular endurance

___   maintain better healing and enhanced feelings of well-being

___   increase your calorie burning ability.

Udo Erasmus says we need 1 Tablespoon of balanced oil sources per 50 pounds of lean body weight (i.e. “normal” weight). Adults need between 65 grams and 100 grams of good fats a day (that’s 15% – 60% of calories from good fats) in a 2,000 calorie a day diet.

Finding ways for kids to accept new foods means that you have to give them versions of what they are already used to eating, and make it fun. Adults, sometimes act the same way, but hemp foods really are tasty, so just give it a go!

With hemp, you’ll be ingesting no pesticides;  this plant is so strong, farmers don’t need to use poisons, so it’s an ecologically-sound, organic crop right away! It’s probably the best ecological, organic protein source.

Buying hemp seed in bulk online from Manitoba Harvest, Nutiva, Navitas Naturals and others will be most economical, as they do sell larger and bulk options.

There are approximately 8 grams of protein in 2 Tablespoons of raw, unhulled hemp seeds (sometimes called hemp hearts). And, hemp contains ALL 10 Essential Amino Acids, too. What a super-food!

Hempseeds are non-gluten food, too, and a great vegetarian and vegan protein source. The same 2 Tablespoons in 1 Cup of spring water or alkaline water, placed in a high-speed blender, will produce nutritious, non-dairy, hemp milk.

Here are some other basic hemp recipes to become basic standards in your repertoire for use every week.

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Dr. BEN KIM’s HUMMUS

1 can organic chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
1-3 T raw organic tahini
juice of 1 small organic lemon
sea salt, to taste
organic extra-virgin olive oil OR hemp oil  (start with 1T)
Hemp protein, too, if desired OR  4T hemp seeds

Optional: a little lemon juice and / or Celtic sea salt

Rinse and bring canned chickpeas to a boil for one minute to help remove preservatives, then drain. If you use dry chickpeas, soak them in water overnight and cook until tender over low to medium heat.

After warming up chickpeas in a pot of boiling water and draining them, combine chickpeas and all other ingredients except oil in a food processor. As the ingredients blend together, add oil until desired consistency is reached.

Use with toasted whole grain bread, sliced tomatoes and lettuce. You can serve hummus at room temperature, cold, or warm – just after mixing.  The hummus keeps well in an airtight container for several days in the refrigerator.

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JULIE MORRIS’ DEHYDRATOR KALE CRISPS

Makes Makes: about 4 servings

Kale chips are very expensive in stores, so here’s how to make your own. Kale is a powerhouse vegetable. It is SO nutritious that it pulls massive nutrients from the soil. In fact you MUST use ORGANIC kale, as this soil-pulling action gathers everything from the soil. In polluted fields, kale is actually used to detoxify the soil and this regular kale is sold as food! The only “safe” kale is organic, which has been grown in non-polluted soil to begin with!

Whether you use an oven or a dehydrator, these chips are exceptionally flavorful.

You can also enjoy this recipe as a delicious fresh kale salad — just put together the ingredients and do not dehydrate.

Note: depending on the size of the kale bunches, you will need more or less salt. Start with just 1/4 tsp and only add more if needed.

2 large bunches organic latigo (also called “dinosaur”) kale
3 T hemp oil
2 T fresh lemon juice

2 t onion powder
½ t Celtic sea salt
1 t garlic powder

¼ t black pepper
2T  heaping, fresh dill, chopped

Remove the thick parts of the stem from the kale leaves, (keep them to use in soups) and tear the leaves into 3″ x 3″ pieces inside a big bowl.

Then, in a small bowl, mix together the oil, lemon juice, onion powder, Celtic sea salt, garlic powder and pepper. Pour this mix into the kale bowl.

Using your hands, gently massage the oil mixture into the kale leaves, squeezing and tossing the vegetables as you go to help soften the leaves. Mix it all for about 2 minutes, then add the dill and toss until combined.

Regular Oven Method:

Heat the oven to 250F degrees.

Spread the kale out as flatly as possibly onto a couple of baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Bake for 50-80 minutes, or until kale has dried out and is crispy.

Keep a close eye on the kale at the end of its cooking process to make sure it does not burn.

Store in an airtight container to prevent kale from softening.

Dehydrator Method (preferred):

Warm the dehydrator to 115F degrees. Spread out the kale onto 4 perforated dehydrator sheets, and dehydrate for 10-12 hours, or until crispy (time may vary depending on the relative humidity on the day you process it).

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HEMP HALAVAH

1 1/2 C shelled hempseeds
1/2 C organic honey (raw), (use another sweetner if to be eaten by children under 3 years old)

Finely grind 1C hempseeds in a coffee grinder (keep 1/2C whole for outer crust).

Empty the 1C ground seeds into a mid-size bowl.

Add honey gradually and knead until smooth. Make sure mixture is solid enough and not too sticky.

Roll out dough on a board or plate, 1/2″ thick. Then, cut into 1″ x 2″ strips.

Spread remaining whole seeds onto plate. Pat the strips in seeds until completely covered.

Store covered  in refrigerator. Use within 3 days.

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JULIE MORRIS’ HEMP FUDGESICLES

1 packet Nutiva Chocolate HempShake
6 oz organic milk (almond, hemp, rice, soy, goat or cow)
1 ripe organic banana
1 T Nutiva organic coconut oil
Optional: a little Grade B organic maple syrup

Mix very well in a blender, and then pour into popsicle moulds. Freeze. ===============================================================

More hemp recipes next time!

Start transferring these to become some of your “basic” recipes. Get the ingredients and just make the recipes your own once you make them once as originals. Make sure not to heat hemp past 325F and it’s better to NEVER HEAT IT.

Best to all — Em

REFERENCE:
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar. The extra page links are at the bottom of the first page.

You can also sign-up for email alerts for when I post to this blog. I try for once a week. The form is on the upper right of the side-bar. Thanks.

(c)2011 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

Read Full Post »

“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs That Information” (TM)

Trying new foods which are healthy is imperative for diabetics, as many people are stuck in a rut, continuing to eat foods and sustain habits which are not helping, and which may harm. The new foods are generally vegetarian, and in this case, they are essential. If you haven’t been eating them, you are putting yourself in jeopardy.  Some options are more expensive than others, but in the BIG food-picture, saving money on one part of your food budget (the most expensive is processed foods and more protein than you need), then enables you to buy healthier fresh or lightly-processed real foods.

We do not have to buy processed foods for the smart 2-snacks-a-day in a diabetic diet. In fact, snacks are a chance to try out other new items and recipes. When this season’s Biggest Loser Finale show this week revealed 59 year old Deni and 35 year old Olivia winning, as the at-home and grand-prize winners, respectively, there were lessons to learn there. We’ll discuss that over coming weeks, but small, healthy meals and snacks, paced through the day, is integral for beating both obesity and diabetes.

Famed holistic physician, Dr. Andrew Weil, MD says “As a physician, I recommend nutritious hemp seeds and oil to anyone interested in maintaining a healthy diet. Everyone will benefit when American farmers can grow this amazing crop once again.

What’s going on here?

Well, Hemp History Week occurred May 2-8, 2011 and you can learn more at: Grow American Hemp! – it’s Nature’s Wonder Food and the safest ecologically for food, clothes (excellent and no pesticides — cotton accounts for 25% of all pesticide use!), building materials, cosmetics, industrial products (Chrysler, Mercedes Benz, Lotus, GM and BMW already use it in cars)  and on and on.

Currently, one needs a permit to grow even industrial hemp (which cannot produce marijuana) and the American government has not been granting permits and has been waging war on those who want to grow this amazing, healthy, useful plant.

It’s even burned fields on the permit-holding, sovereign lands of several Native American tribes, for their own home-building use (they did the American government the  “courtesy” to get a permit, although they should not need it). The ATF agents burned 2 seasons of crops and left individuals and tribes without their crop after investing all their money.

No-one is getting permits in America, and meanwhile, we are importing hemp food and hemp products from Canada and other European and Asian countries which are more enlightened. So, we pay more and our farmers are locked out from one of the few lucrative crops which could help them save their family farms and provide a decent living-wage.

Hemp is one of the most nutritious foods on earth and if I had to choose 3 foods to have plenty of on a desert island, it would be one. Hemp seeds are a nearly-perfect food source. And, they are one of the few foods which have the needed human ratio of 1:3 essential fatty acids (EFAs) of Omega-3s to Omega-6s.

We must get these essential fatty acids everyday: either from cold water fish, molecularly-distilled fish oil capsules, organic hemp seed, organic chia seed or organic flax seed. Omega-3s are severely lacking in the modern diet, and this is possibly why neurological problems are increasing, as the brain is 70% these essential fats. Episodes of Parkinson’s, ADD, Autism, Alzheimers and more, along with IQ’s falling can all be attributed to lack of these EFAs. And, their lack also lets body-wide inflammation wreke havoc; this impacts diabetics directly.

So, like last week, when I wrote about chia seed recipes, I’ll add some interesting hemp seed ones this week.

I prefer NOT to cook hemp seeds, flax seeds or chia seeds. If you do, please do not use any heat higher than 325F. That’s critical. Flaxseeds must be ground to be accessible and then used immediately.

You will not be failing drug tests if you eat hemp! Only those who use drugs will register on those tests.
======================================================================================

HEMP PANCAKES

Makes: About 16 pancakes Prep Time: 15 min Cook Time: 15 min

1 C  shelled hemp seeds (hemp hearts)
3 T nut oil or organic butter (changed)

1 C organic whole wheat flour or organic substitute of choice
2 t no-aluminum baking powder (Rumford’s)

1 t baking soda
1 t Celtic sea salt

4 egg whites – divided, free-range, vegetarian fed —– save the egg yolks (or cook, whole, to medium, separately and serve on side).
1 C plain organic yogurt
2 T organic raw honey (not for those under 3 years old) OR organic maple syrup

1 C spring water
2 T vanilla
Berries (optional)

Combine flour, shelled hemp seed, baking powder, salt and soda in bowl.
Combine egg whites, yogurt, sweetener and water. Whisk in butter or oil.

Pour into dry ingredients. Use blender to mix to smooth consistency. Optional: add in Berries while cooking!

Cook on (buttered) griddle (medium heat, max 325F), until tops are bubbly – turn and cook until browned.

Serve with more maple syrup OR use the Savory Hemp Hummus or Hemp Butter, below. Can be frozen and heated up in toaster.

=======================================================================================
SAVORY HEMP HUMMUS – Manitoba Harvest

Makes 4 cups Prep Time: 10 mins

3 C sprouted organic chick peas OR canned organic chickpeas OR beans
1/2 C hemp hearts (shelled hemp seed)

1/4 C hemp seed oil OR mix of hemp and olive OR all organic, extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves organic garlic
1/4 C organic lemon juice

1/4 C organic parsley
2 T cumin powder
2 T organic red miso

1 t cayenne powder
1 T fresh cracked black pepper

Combine all ingredients in a blender or food processor. Blend on low, stopping to turn the mixture until smooth.

Can be stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator for 4 days.
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HEMP BUTTER

Makes 2 1/4 cups. Prep Time: 5 minutes

1 1/4 C organic hemp seed oil
1 lb organic unsalted butter

Soften butter in a container (over night usually does it)

Add 1 1/4 C hemp seed oil and blend in by hand until hemp oil and butter are partially mixed.

Now use a hand blender on low until it’s completely smooth (and green } texture. Refrigerate and remove a small pat when needed.

Usually softens enough to spread at room temp in about 10 minutes. Remember not to cook with it. Keep the temp low and simmer if you must. Compliments of Tom Kowalsky Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
======================================================================================
COCONUT MANNA™ OATMEAL

1 bowl of hot oatmeal
2 T Coconut Manna™ (organic, extra-virgin coconut oil)
2 T Nutiva shelled hempseed
1 T organic honey or organic maple syrup

Gently mix together. Serve hot or warm.
========================================================================================
VEGGIE HEMP CHILI – Manitoba Harvest

Makes: 6 servings
Prep Time: 10 min. Cook Time: 45 min.

2 t organic, extra-virgin coconut oil
3/4 onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced

3 C canned peeled organic tomatoes, chopped, with juice
1 C hemp hearts (shelled hemp seed)
1/3 C spring water

3 T chili powder, more if desired
2 t organic blackstrap molasses
3/4 t cumin

1/8 t cayenne pepper
1/2 t black pepper
1-1/2 C canned organic pinto beans, rinsed and drained

1-1/2 C canned organic black beans
1 jalapeno pepper (optional), diced

Heat oil in a heavy saucepan over medium heat. Saute onion and garlic until softened.

Stir in next 8 ingredients and bring to a boil. Immediately reduce heat to medium low and simmer 15 minutes.

Add beans and simmer another 20-30 minutes, adding water if chili becomes too thick. Stir jalapeno pepper into chili just before serving.
=====================================================================================
VEGGIE HEMP BURGERS – Manitoba Harvest

Makes: 6 patties
Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes

10 ounces soft tofu
1 C hemp hearts (shelled hemp seeds)
1/4 C sunflower seeds

1/4C scallions, chopped
2 T soy sauce
2 T nutritional yeast

1/2 t dried basil
2 C herb seasoned stuffing — substitute (2C cooked quinoa OR 2C cooked brown rice OR combo)

In a blender, puree tofu then add the rest of the ingredients except stuffing / quinoa and brown rice. Put the mix into a bowl and pour tofu mixture over top. Combine well. Form into burger patties and bake on a greased cookie sheet in a 300 F oven for 25-30 minutes or until golden brown.
=======================================================================================
More hemp recipes next time!

Best to all — Em

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar. The extra page links are at the bottom of the first page.

You can also sign-up for email alerts for when I post to this blog. I try for once a week. The form is on the upper right of the side-bar. Thanks.

(c)2011 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

Read Full Post »

“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs Thus Information!”(TM)

Diabetics have sensitive biochemistry, some of which needs to be re-calibrated. However, most Westerners now are in short supply of natural Omega-3 essential fatty acids — for brain and heart and reducing inflammation, all of which impact diabetic health. Where can you get Omega-3 essential fats?

Most references will say “cold water fish”, but some fisheries are depleted (see the endangered or at-risk fish species at Monterrey Bay Aquarium’s site), others are not in clean waters. So, more clearly, I will say:

___   Only WILD fish. NO farmed fish. Always ask!

___   Only fish which are small and lower on the food-chain,  (so less chance to get mercury-toxicity from our ruined environment) and from very-cold waters — avoid tuna, for sure, except albacore “tuna” which is really a mackerel species and is a smaller fish.

You can use wild mackerels, cods, salmon and halibut (it’s too expensive for most of us). Pollack would also work, but most of it is bought up by industrial processors and then it is made into fake-food as Fake Krab etc., (it’s too processed to consider).

___   For vegetarians, and budget-minded people, there are also plant-sources of Omega 3. All the seeds should be Organic. The usually-touted Flaxseed is actually the least-usable. It’s OK to use it if it’s ground (and it must be used immediately after grinding!).  Better, is using Hemp Seed, which is almost Nature’s perfect food, and it has the perfect lipid profile, one of the few foods which properly balances polyunsaturated fats, monosaturated fats and Omega-3 fats. You can also use Hemp Milk. And, lastly, new-kid-on-the-block is Chia Seed — sometimes marketed by patented names like Salba(R) and BenVia Gold (R).

NOTE: If you are sensitive to sesame seed, you may also have an intolerance for Chia.

All seeds should be kept in the refrigerator, as should nuts, each in airtight containers, with the least air. I put it in a ziploc bag, squeezed to expel air, and then the bag put into a tight-lid plastic carton in the refrigerator, to prevent moisture gaining access, even to the outer bag.

___ Some nuts have a little Omega-3 in them, too.

___  We might find flesh from Arctic and Antarctic birds, mammals and penguins also have high Omega-3 content, but most people do not hunt these, or have access to them. In fact, the Inuit and the Inuu — whom we call “Eskimos” — used to have NO heart disease when they ate these animals. Now that they hunt less and mainly eat processed foods, their illness rank is sky-rocketing!

Most of us are willing to eat fish, but if not, use the vegetarian sources. You MUST get Omega-3 sources in your daily diet, everyday, to have a real chance at Health.  If you decide to use supplements, fish oil must be “molecularly distilled“, otherwise, the processor is concentrating environmental toxins.

I am sure that most of us have favorite salmon and cod recipes — poached, lightly-broiled are best. There are some in my Titles Archive, on the upper navigation bar.

Many of us know little about using the seeds, however, so I’ll concentrate on that.

Make sure that your children are eating these foods! You want to try to head-off pre-diabetes and if they are already Type 1 diabetics, these foods should help them be healthier.

==========================================================================

2 Minute Basic Chia Fresca (Iskiate)

1/2 T organic chia seeds
1/2 t organic lemon juice
1 g stevia – low-glycemic, natural sweetener (like Truvia)( 1 gram = 1 packet)
12 oz natural spring water or alkaline water (like Essentia) – chilled

Combine ingredients and chill 1/2 hour before consuming, in order to thicken the chia into a gel (the traditional way to drink the beverage). You can also whisk the mix beforehand, for a few minutes, to make it “gel” faster.

Serves 1.

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Orange Chia Fresca

1 T organic chia seeds
8 oz. spring water or organic coconut water
1  organic orange (Valencias are most used for juicing)
1 t organic blue agave nectar, (or equivalent stevia is better)(Truvia)

1. Add the chia seeds to the water, let sit for 10 minutes or more.
2. Juice the orange, add the fresh squeezed juice to the chia gel.
3. Add the agave or stevia (Truvia).
4. Serve with a spoon or straw for stirring while you drink.

Serves 1

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Banana Hemp-Chia Pudding

1/2 -1 c. chia gel )(soak organic seeds in hemp milk or coconut water)(start: 6T organic chia seeds + 1/2C organic liquid)
3 – 4 whole frozen organic banana (peel before freezing)
1-2 C organic hemp milk
1t per person, organic extra-virgin coconut oil

Soak chia seeds in some hemp milk overnight to make chia gel. (For a thicker gel, hang in cheesecloth over a bowl in the refrigerator, (like yoghurt prep). You can also whisk the mix beforehand, for a few minutes, to make it “gel” faster.

Blend with a frozen banana and more hemp milk.
Freeze.
Blend again.

Optional: add cinnamon and / or organic walnuts.

Serves approx. 3 people.

============================================================================
Leah Celeste’s Bulk Chia Smoothie Base

1C organic chia seed
6 C natural spring water
3 C organic nut milk OR organic hemp milk OR organic coconut water OR combo

Mix the chia with the water and allow to gel for about 30 mins to an hour. Use a wire whisk to mix the seeds with the water, the more and better you whisk it up the better it will gel up.

Then add your vegetarian milks or coconut water  and whisk again.

You can eat the thinner version in about 30 minutes or put it in the refrigerator for a few hours to thicken up.

This recipe will keep in the refrigerator for a few days and you can just scoop out what you want to eat. Flavor with banana, berries, dried fruit, cinnamon, cardamom, sweeteners, cocoa powder, coconut oil, coconut milk and anything else you like!
==================================================================================

Kristen’s Dehydrator Chocolate Chia Crackers and Spreads

Yield 1 dehydrator tray (quantity depends on size you cut)

1 C organic chia seeds
2 C natural spring water
Juice of 1 orange (organic)
1 apple, organic – cored, chopped
1/4 C raw chocolate powder (Navitas is a favorite brand)
2 T  raw agave nectar or equivalent Truvia stevia
6 dates, pitted
dash Himalayan crystal salt OR Celtic Sea Salt

Soak your chia seeds for 30 minutes in a large bowl with 1 1/2 C of the water.

Blend the remaining ingredients (including the remaining 1/2 cup of water) together. Add the blended mixture to the bowl with soaked chia seeds and stir to mix.

Break up any chia seed clumps with your rubber spatula or spoon. Let the mixture sit (as is) for 15-30 minutes.

Spread the mixture on a dehydrator tray lined with a non-stick paraflex sheet and score the batter to desired size (be careful not to cut the paraflex sheet.).

(For a thinner cracker, divide between two trays.) Dehydrate at 135 degrees for 60 minutes. Reduce the temperature to 105 degrees and dehydrate another 6-8 hours.

Flip crackers onto another tray without a paraflex sheet and peel off the paraflex sheet being used previously. Dehydrate another 6-10 hours, or until you reach your desired dryness.

Chocolate Hazelnut Butter Spread
Yield 1 1/4 cups

1 1/2 C  organic hazelnuts
3 T  raw chocolate powder
1 1/2 T organic agave nectar
1/2 C organic cashews
2 T organic extra-virgin coconut oil
pinch Himalayan crystal salt OR Celtic Sea Salt

Process all of the ingredients above in a food processor, fitted with the “S” blade, until creamy.

Sweet Southern Peach Jam
Yield 1 cup

1 C frozen peaches, thaw (get organic peaches; others are heavily sprayed!)
3 dates, pitted, soaked 20 minutes, drained
1 T raw, organic  blue agave nectar OR equivalent stevia / Truvia

Blend all of the ingredients together.

===============================================================================

More recipes, especially for Hemp, next time.

Best to all — Em

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar. The extra page links are at the bottom of the first page.

You can also sign-up for email alerts for when I post to this blog. I try for once a week. The form is on the upper right of the side-bar. Thanks.

(c)2011 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

Read Full Post »

“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

The British Royal Family tends to use alternative medicine practitioners and seems in quite good shape, especially Queen Elizabeth at 85 and the Duke of Edinburgh at 90. What can we learn here and what can we learn from their food choice perspective for celebrations?

Eighteen years ago, the Queen’s naturopathic physician, at that time, made a visit to my American city and was doing health consultations. All of my own family went. Jan de Vries had been trained in Switzerland by famed physician Dr. Alfred Vogel and came back to practice in Britain, with a couple of clinics in London and in Scotland. His view of keeping one’s Health was simple: keep Balance, and if lost, then regain it with life-giving, natural methods.

I think this is why you see such a calm demeanor in Queen Elizabeth, even though her work-load is grueling, especially for a senior citizen. She is surrounded by all that wealth and power and yet she lives a simple-life amidst it, for Balance. And, by all accounts, she’s very healthy in mind and body, just what we’d hope to be at her age.

So, as she walked down the 400 feet from her car at the entry, to the high altar in Westminster Abbey, to attend the wedding of her grandson Prince William Philip Arthur Louis Windsor and Catherine Elizabeth Middleton, we saw an elder to emulate, who took it all in her stride. She also wisely knew not to upset her routine and “party” into the night with the youngsters. Instead, she celebrated with family and dignataries at lunch, with family and friends at dinner, and then retired to Windsor Castle for a normal bedtime, leaving Buckingham Palace to party to 6am!

And, for the food she chose at Luncheon, which was the only menu I saw published, (dinner was in Prince Charles’ purview) (much of the food was sourced from his organic farm for both meals), what can we see as to how to enjoy food at a celebration and yet be prudent?

Here’s the menu, and in all cases, we don’t have the details of the recipe, so these are general  comments.

Cornish Crab Pate on Lemon Blini
Pressed Duck Terrine with Fruit Chutney
Roulade of Goat’s Cheese with Carmelized Walnuts
Variety of Palmiers and Cheese Straws (grain carbs / fancy crackers)
Scottish Smoked Salmon on Beetroot Blini (Blintzes)
Miniature Watercress and Asparagus Tarts
Poached Asparagus Spears and Hollandaise Sauce
Quails Eggs with Celery Salt
Scottish Langoustines (a type of small lobster) with lemon mayo, pressed pork and cracklings
Wild Mushroom and Celeriac Chausson
Bubble and Sqyeak with Organic Lamb Confit
Grainy Mustard with Chipolata Sausages
Smoked Scotch Haddock Fishcake with Pea Guacamole
Miniature Yorkshire Pudding with Roast Filet of Organic Beef and Horseradish Mousse

Desserts:
Gateau Opera
Blood Orange Pate of Fruits
Raspberry Financier
Rhubarb Creme Brulee Tarlets
Passionfruit Praline
White Ganache Chocolate Truffle
Milk Chocolate Praline with Nuts

WEDDING CAKES:
Traditional English Fruitcake
McVitties Chocolate Biscuit Cake from a Palace Recipe.

___   The first thing I noticed was that the food was “local” and in season.

___   Next, the food was organic or sourced from clean waters, etc. and it was weighted towards fish and shellfish, rather than red meats.

___   The portions were small and able to be tailored to an individual’s appetite according to what and how many items a person ate.

___   There were numerous options for Orthodox Jews and Muslims (fish, vegetables, vegetarian foods, fruits) as well as lacto-ovo vegetarians.

___   There was an array of mostly low-fat protein sources or healthy fats.

___   There were nationally-traditional recipes and traditional family recipes used as well as some adventurous ones for “foodies”.

___   There was an abundance of vegetables.

___   Fruit was relied on for most of the desserts.

___   The starchy desserts or accompaniments were not to excess.

I am sure that if you really gorged yourself on these amouse-bouche canapes, you could get a serious calorie count, but if you ate sensibly, this could be quite a delicious and healthy meal.

Now, here’s a Palace recipe which was speculated in The Mirror newspaper, by former Palace chefs, to be served, but it was not chosen. However, as other Palace recipes were not shared, and this one sounds delicious and healthy, this one is a “keeper” for all occasions.

GLEANEAGLE’S PÂTÉ
(Serves 12 plus)

2 lbs smoked salmon, thinly sliced and divided
1 lb smoked trout
1.5 lbs unsalted, organic butter, softened, divided into 6 portions *

1 T finely chopped fresh dill
1 t lemon juice
1 lbs smoked mackerel

1 T finely chopped fresh chives

Line a 1lb loaf tin or pate terrine with plastic wrap, overlapping the sides. Take half of the smoked salmon and line the sides and bottom of the loaf tin. Overlap the top edge by two inches, so the salmon will fold over and finally cover the filling at the top-level of the terrine dish.

Remove and discard the skin from the smoked trout.  Place the trout in a food processor and chop finely; add 1/3  of the butter to the processor.

Blend again until smooth and add chopped dill and lemon juice.

Carefully put dollops of the trout mix into the terrine and gently link-up and even the level.  Place the loaf tin in the freezer for 10 minutes while you prepare the second layer.

Clean the food processor bowl. Remove and discard skin from the mackerel, and place the mackerel into the food processor; chop finely.

Add 2 portions of butter and blend until smooth. Take the loaf tin from the freezer, and spread the mackerel mixture smoothly on top of the trout layer.

Place the loaf tin back in the freezer for 10 minutes while you prepare the third layer.

Clean the food processor bowl yet again. Place remaining smoked salmon in the food processor and chop finely. Add remaining two portions of butter and chives to the processor and blend again until smooth.

Remove loaf tin from the freezer, and spread the smoked salmon on top of the mackerel. Smooth the top.

Fold the overlapping pieces of smoked salmon over the top layer of the salmon spread.

Cover the top with plastic wrap, and refrigerate overnight, or for at least four hours, until firm. Remove from refrigerator and lift off top plastic wrap.

Invert the terrine on to a cutting board and remove the loaf tin and additional plastic wrap. Slice the terrine into one inch slices. Serve on salad leaves as a sit-down appetizer or slice the terrine into suitably-sized strips and serve on suitably-sized and shaped crackers, as a canape hors d’oeuvre.

* Do NOT substitute margarine or non-organic butter. Either of those other items are NOT healthy and margarine may also not do the job of solidifying the pate at all.

Enjoy!

Best to all — Em

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