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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM

The past couple of weeks, we’ve looked at diabetic-friendly beverages. The following herbal recipe contains 3 anti-inflammatory herbs. As diabetes contains an inflammatory process, this beverage should be helpful in making healthy diabetes food choices.

This is also a low fructose recipe as pineapples only contain moderate amounts. There are serious issues about how fructose behaves in our bodies (see below) and we should not ingest any more than 1 – 2 pieces of low-fructose fruits, daily. Learn more about low fructose foods, here (note the measurements here are in milligrams [mg] and 1,000 mg = 1 gram [g].

I also advise NO juices most of the time, except vegetable juices (note: tomato is a fruit).

Dr. Mercola’s fructose recommendations are no more than 25 grams of fructose a day (and only 15g. from whole fruits  —no juices). All fruit must be ORGANIC!

An apple contains 9 grams.  One whole pear would be most of your limit, as would be 1 cup of grapes or 1/4 cup of raisins. These just mentioned fruits are to be used carefully. Other dried fruits should be used even more carefully, if at all.

Of the melons, watermelon is the most nutritious and least problematic except for fructose issues; you reach your daily fructose limit using just 1/16 of a medium watermelon.

The Best Fruit Choices: Kiwi, berries, pineapple, citrus (lemon, lime, grapefruit, tangerine, orange), fresh apricots, fresh prunes, cherries, nectarine, peach, papaya, guava, banana, avocados and moderate amounts of tomato.

NOTE: The nightshade vegetables and fruits (white and red and yellow potatoes, eggplant, tomatoes, tomatillos, cape gooseberry) are implicated as sources of inflammatory chemicals causing arthritis pain in sensitive individuals. So, if you are having skeletal or muscle pains, these foods might be reduced or eliminated for a few months to see if your Health improves. Sweet potatoes come from a different botanical family and do not cause these issues.

Pomegranate is not on the charts at the links. I use only the prophylactic 2 oz. dose of unsweetened pomegranate a day, as 1 of my few fruits (I mostly eat vegetables).

As this 2 oz. dose of pomegranate helps clear out cholesterol-restricted arteries (harmed by inflammation, and using cholesterol as a “natural bandaid”), I think it is probably OK, as long as we make enough natural cholesterol (from organic coconut oil’s medium-chain fatty acids) to do all the “good work” that cholesterol is meant to do.

Vitamin D is also important in this process and as much as 8,000 IU of Vitamin D3 seem to be needed rather than the 800 IU spoken about now.

Evidently, even at 8,000 IU (equivalent to 20 minutes in summer sun over 40% of your body skin), there is not toxicity, but the Vitamin D3 (only supplement form to use) is still NOT as good as natural sunlight. The supplement is not ready-to-use by our body, yet, and if we do not do the extra step well (which requires cholesterol), then we are still Vitamin D deficient.

Dr. Mercola continues about the harm from fructose:

“Thanks to the excellent work of researchers like Dr. Robert Lustig , and Dr. Richard Johnson, we now know that fructose:

  • Is metabolized differently from glucose, with the majority being turned directly into fat
  • Tricks your body into gaining weight by turning off your body’s appetite-control system. Fructose does not appropriately stimulate insulin, which in turn does not suppress ghrelin (the “hunger hormone”) and doesn’t stimulate leptin (the “satiety hormone”), which together result in your eating more and developing insulin resistance.
  • Rapidly leads to weight gain and abdominal obesity (“beer belly”), decreased HDL, increased LDL, elevated triglycerides, elevated blood sugar, and high blood pressure — i.e., classic metabolic syndrome (Em: also known as Syndrome X).
  • Over time leads to insulin resistance, which is not only an underlying factor of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, but also many cancers.”

Agave is also problematic and turns out to be just as bad as High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) which is a cheap sweetener found in almost all processed and refined foods. Both wreck your Health.

In the past, I espoused agave as it is “low-glycemic”, but the stuff is at least 75% fructose (that’s high!) and it has other serious Health consequences because of that. In the 1970’s, powdered crystaline fructose was touted as “better” than sucrose (“table sugar”) and so we used it. Crystaline fructose is the worst of all. I sure wish scientists were interested in the research back then!

The only safe sweeteners for diabetics, and anyone else, are moderate amounts of pure ORGANIC maple syrup and stevia or organic brown sugar, like Succanat (even less frequently) I prefer the liquid form of stevia, after trying many of the powders.

Organic honey can be used rarely, as all honey has a fairly high amount of fructose, but it has some other benefits. (Never give raw honey to children under 3!); it has botulism spores, as does all honey, and children under 3  immune systems can’t handle that, yet. Organic molasses can also be used sparingly, infrequently.

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WEEKEND WARRIORS JOINT TEA

Three of the herbs incorporated into this drink — turmeric, ginger and cardamom — produce a natural anti-inflammatory effect. The black pepper and the cayenne also help to synergize the benefit of the anti-inflammatory herbs. Cayenne also helps to raise your metabolic rate so you burn calories better. Be aware that cayenne should not be overdone as you do not want to have digestive upset.

I recommend only using organic, non-irradiated spices. Regular spices are irradiated (they don’t have to say that on the label).

6 cardamom pods, cracked
1 T chopped fresh turmeric* or ¼ teaspoon ground dried turmeric
1 T chopped fresh ginger
¼ t whole black peppercorns
2C   filtered or spring water
organic, ground cayenne pepper, to taste
1C pineapple juice, chilled **
2 mint sprigs for garnish, optional

In a small pot, combine the first 4 ingredients with 2C of water. Cover and bring to a gentle boil.  Turn off the heat and set aside to steep for 20 minutes.

Using a strainer, pour the tea into a large jar, add pineapple juice and chill. Before serving, add the organic cayenne pepper to taste.

Divide the tea between 2 – 4 glasses.  If desired, bruise the mint sprigs in the glass.

* You should be able to find fresh turmeric (a member of the Ginger Family) in Asian markets, where it will be part of the recipe for curry powder. Enjoy! Turmeric (and its active ingredient, curcumin, is a wonder-food. More about it in later posts).

** the pineapple provides bromelain, an enzyme which helps digest your food (and is efficacious elsewhere in your body), but this would only be present in fresh, fresh puree and frozen forms, not canned.

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Best to all — Em

REFERENCE:  see the links above to Nutrition Data’s Fructose Charts and Doctor Mercola’s article. The recipe originated at Bottom Line.

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar.

You can also sign-up for email alerts for when I post to this blog. I try for once a week. The form is on the upper right of the side-bar. Thanks.

(c)2011 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information” (TM)

As “Indian Summer” brings its reprise, here are some herbal recipes for beating-the-heat, and they are helpful alternatives for diabetics. Many herbs are effective in ameliorating symptoms and causes for diabetic reactions. This series has been highlighting some of the best. The first recipe helps to make ice-cream just a bit more useful — as the Lavender is a stress-reducer. ===========================================================================================

MURPHY’S LAVENDER AND WHITE CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM

2T lavender flowers 500ml spring or filtered water
1T liquid organic honey
65 g sugar [[Em: use organic brown sugar and I’ve halved it already, to start]]
5 organic egg yolks
200 ml organic milk [NOT ultra-pasteurized]
80 g white chocolate [dark chocolate is far healthier, so consider it]
240 ml organic cream
1/4 teaspoon pure organic vanilla extract
(stevia, as needed)

___   Cook the lavender flowers in the water over a low heat until the water reduces to 1/10th of the original volume. This makes an infusion. Remove from the heat and strain. Stir in the honey and set aside, covered.
___   Melt the chocolate in a double boiler, over water.
___   Beat the sugar and egg yolks together just until pale yellow. Meanwhile …
___   Bring the milk to a low simmer, and watch it the whole time. If you have one, using a cast-iron plate for the burner distributes the heat better and protects from hot-spots which can burn the milk.
___   Remove the milk from the heat and beat the milk into the egg and sugar mixture in a slow stream. Pour the mixture back into the pot and place over low heat. Stir continuously until the custard thickens slightly (around 65-70C) and just coats the back of a spoon. But, at this temperature, you have not got a pasteurized egg mix.

To pasteurize the eggs: heat the custard to 73C and maintain that temperature for at least 5 minutes. Use a cooking thermometer, and definitely keep stirring! Don’t over-heat, though, because at around 76C you will scramble the eggs! Immediately remove from the heat, and then cover and place in the freezer to cool slightly, as the custard must still be warm to mix with the chocolate — so aim for about 70C.

___   The chocolate and the custard must both be warm when you mix them so they emulsify well. If not, the chocolate will clump at first when you add the liquid, but if you keep adding liquid and stirring, it will come smooth. Add only small amounts each time.  It is now safe to taste the product and add stevia, if needed.

___   Allow to cool, then mix in the vanilla and strained lavender water.
___   Whip the cream until it has doubled in volume; it should have soft peaks. Don’t over-whip! Next, fold the cream into the custard using a gentle motion to stir (with a vertical, slicing, circular motion).
___   Taste the cream-base now, again,  and adjust with stevia and vanilla.
___   Freeze using a home ice cream machine, or cover and place in a shallow tray or cake pan  in the freezer, stirring every few hours to break up the ice crystals (my father used to make ice-cream this way 60 years ago!).

If you’re using a home ice cream machine, then transfer the mixture to a freezer-proof covered container when the ice cream has just achieved a semi-solid consistency (around 15 minutes). Place it back in the freezer, and let it continue to freeze until it is solid. Clean your machine — it did its job.

Notes: The pot in which you melt the chocolate must be completely dry or the chocolate can clump. Vanilla essences vary, so make sure you taste the custard and are happy with the flavor before you freeze it! =====================================================================================================
Next, an effective diabetic-friendly beverage to slake your thirst effectively, especially in the hot dog-days of Summer. It’s a traditional American drink, now making its way around the world. When the farmers were bringing in the harvest under the hot American sun in the early 1800s, they couldn’t drink the copious amounts of water they needed not to become dehydrated as that amount would have bloated their stomachs and made it uncomfortable to work … and springs were sometimes far away, too.

So, building on a much older tradition (from approx. the 1600s), a new version of the Oxymel drink from Medieval times. The new drink was called “Haymaker’s Punch” and also, later, “Switchel“.

As the hay is about to be brought in during the next few weeks, this is the perfect time for this refreshing, satisfying Summer drink!

Not only will the apple cider vinegar help with blood-sugar control (as shown in many studies), but it will help with weight-loss and purportedly also help with better sleep and more comfortable GI tract.

The maple is actually a good sweetener for diabetics, if in small portions. Ginger is a potent anti-inflammatory and that’s important for diabetics, too.

Haymaker’s Punch is a healthy beverage, especially in comparison to modern commercial beverages.

Here are a couple of recipes and I may share more next week. The essential ingredients are:
___   Bragg’s or Spectrum’s organic apple cider vinegar (with the mother of vinegar). Only use these brands, not Heinz etc.,
___   filtered or spring water, never tap water
___   organic honey or organic Grade B maple syrup
___   organic blackstrap molasses (in some recipes)
___   fresh, grated ginger

======================================================================= DAVE’S PORTLAND SWITCHEL WITH STEVIA

2 C filtered or spring water, chilled
1 T Bragg’ apple cider vinegar
1/4 t stevia extract ( PureVia or TrueVia) **
1/8 t ground ginger*

For a 5-cup thermos bottle, use about 3 T ACV, 3/4 t stevia, and 3/8 t dry ginger. Then add chilled, filtered water to the top.

Coconut vinegar has got an amazing flavor, and this is a healthy experiment:
3 T coconut vinegar (I think Whole Foods carries it)
3/4 t stevia powder
3/8 t ground ginger *
1/8 t ground cinnamon
all in a 5-cup thermos bottle, then fill to the top with chilled, filtered water

Dave says “The hint of cinnamon really perked up this drink. It’s now sort of like drinking a spiced vanilla cookie with a slightly tangy spark”.

* Food.com says 1/8 teaspoon of powdered ginger is equal to about 1 Tablespoon of fresh, grated ginger, but it notes that “the flavor of ground ginger can be significantly different from fresh”. If using fresh ginger, slice it thinly or grate it. Put into about 4 cups of water and bring to simmer for 15 minutes. Let cool and squeeze out the solids (you can still use them in cookies).

** If you are trying liquid stevia, then use 1 dropperful per 10 – 12 fl.oz of water and per 1T apple cider vinegar or coconut vinegar. ============================================================== Best to all — Em

REFERENCE: to access more of the series: Diabetic Herbs The extra page links to the whole series are on that page.

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar.

You can also sign-up for email alerts for when I post to this blog. I try for once a week. The form is on the upper right of the side-bar. Thanks.

(c)2011 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

Continuing with the Culinary Herbs Useful to Diabetics series, here are some more recipes! Food IS Medicine, just as Hippocrates, the father of western medicine said. Indian Ayurveda – humanity’s oldest medical system, which birthed all the rest – uses food as medicine, too. Join a long lineage of healing with foods for diabetic treatment.

Here are 3 sweet potato recipes today. This food is a nutritional powerhouse and can fulfill important fiber requirements, as well as boosting Vitamin A nourishment critical for diabetes — by helping to support your eyes’ and skin’s Health with the vitamin’s building block: beta-carotene.

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MASHED SWEET POTATOES WITH LAVENDER AND LIME
from the Lavender Cookbook by Sharon Shipley

2 lbs organic sweet potatoes
1 stick organic, unsalted butter, melted (or equivalent of organic coconut oil)
1/4 C fresh lime juice
1/2 t crushed Certified Organic Jardin du Soleil Culinary Lavender*
Celtic or other sea salt and freshly ground pepper
minced fresh cilantro leaves (do not cut ahead of time)
grated zest of one lime
cayenne pepper, to taste — start with 1/8t and work upwards

This food may be made up to 2 days ahead and refrigerated. Then, rewarm it to serve. Sweet potatoes are an excellent alkaline pH food!

___   Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
___   Prick the sweet potatoes several times with a fork, and then place on a foil-lined baking sheet. Bake for 1 hour, or until very soft. Set them aside until cool enough to handle. Be careful, as they retain their heat.
___   Scoop the flesh right up to the skin’s border. Discard the skins.
___   Using a blender or food processor, pulse until a smooth mixture forms.
___   Stir in the butter, lime juice and lavender.
___   Next, season with salt, fresh pepper and cayenne pepper to taste.
___   Just at serving time, top with cilantro and lime zest, and serve. Do not cut the cilantro ahead of time, as it can impair the flavor.

*Lavender can be finely ground in a spice grinder, a mortar and pestle or in a thoroughly-cleaned coffee grinder (least recommended).

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EM’S SWEET POTATO HUMMUS SPREAD

Because sweet potatoes and coconut are excellent pH alkaline foods, I added, the following to offset the acidic pH of the beans:

___   steamed sweet potatoes (about 2 cups, cubed small) to 1 tub of Trader Joe’s Roasted Red Pepper Hummus (10 oz. size)

___    add a dash of Coconut Secret’s Coconut Aminos (from Whole Foods or coconutsecret.com)

___   Spread it on NO Thiamin Mononitrate crackers or breads! Check the labels, as this synthetic B vitamin flour additive is harmful. Natural, whole-grain breads from health stores are less likely to have it at all.

For those who do not have a Trader Joe’s nearby, the ingredients listed are: 

___   ground chickpeas (you can use healthier cooked black-eye peas or dal)

___   tahini (sesame seed paste) – from health stores or Mid-East markets

___   fresh puree of organic red bell pepper or bottled pimento

___   (canola) oil – use extra-virgin olive oil instead

___   sea salt, lemon juice, garlic powder

If you make this at home, using a standard recipe like the one below, then you will not have the stabilizers in commercial hummus, either (which I did not show here), and you will be making a better pH alkaline food.

This would be great in children’s school lunches! And, it’s a perfect after school snack, too, as well as hors d’ouvre.

Home-made can always be healthier with the right recipe. Next time, I’ll make mine, but in a pinch, combining better ingredients into the Trader Joe’s product made it healthier.

Original recipe

SWEET POTATO HUMMUS
From Jaclyn Enchin ~ http://www.sketch-freeveganeating.blogspot.com

Makes 6 servings

1 medium sweet potato, cooked
1 C  cooked chickpeas
2 T tahini (unsweetened sesame seed paste)
1 T  olive oil
1 T   lemon juice
2-3 t  coconut aminos (a protein source, salty-perky taste)
1 sm  garlic clove, fresh
1 t   cumin
1/2 t  cinnamon
1 t  coriander, fresh
Pinch of sea salt
black pepper, to taste
diced or sliced organic almonds, for topping

Combine all above ingredients into a food processor and blend until smooth.

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MAKING THE PERFECT OMELET

Eggs are nutritious for diabetics, but there are some guidelines to have them be the healthiest.

Firstly, they should be organic, vegetarian fed, free-range animals producing the eggs. Next, the eggs should never be whisked together as breaking the yolks exposes them to oxygen which is when the oxidized yolks become unhealthy, engendering heart disease.

Unbroken yolks have natural balancers (lecithin +) and are heart-healthy.

So, only cook intact eggs – either boiling, coddling, poaching (my favorite) or making the unique omelet technique I explain below but separating the eggs first.

In my method, the egg whites are beaten as directed. The unbroken egg yolks are added later as filling. Add the diabetic herbs at the same time as the yolks — desired savory combinations of turmeric (which will help color the eggs to the usual more yellow look; garlic, fresh onion (minced small), rosemary (ground fine),  cayenne pepper, fresh basil, parsley, ginger. For a sweet-oriented omelet, use diabetic-friendly lavender (grind finely), ginger or cinnamon. Disperse the herbs well over the entire surface.

America’s Test Kitchen explains why this recipe works:

“In contrast to half-moon diner-style omelets, the French omelet is a pristine rolled affair.”  Critically, the temperature of the pan must be just right, the eggs beaten just so (NO, as explained above — I adapt this part!), and hand movements must be swift. This usually intimidates home cooks, but it need not.

In their experiments, America’s Test Kitchen (ATK) (a PBS TV show) ditched the stuffy attitude and came up with a foolproof method for making the ideal French omelet — unblemished outer surface with an ultra-creamy texture, rolled around minimal filling (the diabetic herbs are perfect, along with some cheese, or not).

The classic French method requires a black carbon steel omelet pan and a fork. A nonstick skillet worked fine here (but I am NOT a fan of these pans which always must be used a medium or lower heat ranges).

Instead of a fork, which will scrape nonstick pans (also hazardous to ingest the coating), ATK used bamboo skewers and wooden chopsticks which made small curds with a silky texture. They tested various pans and the Kitchenaaid non-stick at about $20 was fine, if pre-warmed as directed. The Julia Child and Calaphon pans were expensive and excellent.

Adding a little oil, and then preheating the pan for 10 minutes over low heat eliminated any hot spots. For creaminess, very cold butter was added just after the egg (whites) were in the pan. The cold butter dispersed evenly and fused with the eggs for a moist, rich omelet.

To keep the omelet light, ATK found the perfect number of strokes — and, as it’s the egg whites which hold the “loftiness”, my changes should not affect this much, if at all. They used precisely 80 strokes with a classic metal hand-whisk, not one stroke less or more. Be exact here! Copper bowls also help to add lightness to egg whites, so I suggest a copper bowl for my version technique, if you have one. Make sure to keep a copper utensil well-cleaned, as the copper-oxide coating is not healthy.

Excessive beating physically unravels egg proteins, leading to denseness!

For cooking temperature, they tried different heat levels, but even at medium heat, the omelet cooked so quickly it was hard to judge when it was done.  Therefore, turn off the heat when it is still runny (add the egg yolks and herbs) and cover it to finish cooking!

Finally, for an easy rolling method, which mirrors a classic French presentation, slide the newly-cooked omelet onto paper towel. Then, use the towel to start to roll the omelet into the sought-after cigar-shape cylinder.

Because making omelets is such a quick process, make sure to have all your ingredients and equipment at the ready — this is called “mise en place”.

If you don’t have skewers or chopsticks to stir the egg whites, then use the handle of a wooden spoon.

Warm the plates in a 200-degree oven. Serve on the warmed plates.

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Best to all — Em

REFERENCE:
Diabetes Recipes – Lavender
Diabetes – Herbs that Help — Lavender
Diabetes Recipes – Herb List
Diabetes Medicine Alert
Diabetic Concerns – marjoram and nutmeg
Diabetes – Low Thyroid Connection
Thyroid Connections to Diabetes
Herbal Help Diabetic GI Problems

Diabetics and Essential Fatty Acid Omega-3

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar. The extra page links are at the bottom of the first page.

You can also sign-up for email alerts for when I post to this blog. I try for once a week. The form is on the upper right of the side-bar. Thanks.

(c)2011 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website address shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

The past 4 posts have been laying out the case about why Omega 3 fats are especially essential to fight diabetes and the accompanying physical issues which diabetics often wrestle with. Here’s some more about Omega 3 fish sources as well as  recipes to use as basics, in your kitchen!

For cold-water fish sources of Omega 3s, it’s important to know the “provenance” of the fish (i.e. what exact species and where they were fished).

Most lists just say Omega 3 sources are ‘cold water fish’. Sometimes they mention species (like “cod”, “salmon” etc.), but this is NOT good enough!

If we are to protect the oceans and ourselves, we must know more and then act to “preserve the natural fishery” and eat clean, pristine fish!

Here’s some more complete information about these “cold-water” fish and keep yourself updated at the Environmental Defense Fund site and Monterey Bay Aquarium “Seafood Watch” site!

Cold-water Omega-3 species to be AVOIDED are:

___   Atlantic cod – due to overfishing

___   Pacific cod (from imported sources) – poor product, bad environment

___  farmed salmon, from anywhere! same as above for cod

Cold-water Omega-3 speciesBest Choices are:

___   Arctic Char – farmed in fast, natural streams, in America and Norway and in cleaned recirculating closed systems. Also called Iwana and Alpine Char

___   Pacific cod – farmed US west coast – fished using bottom long-line technique or trap or hook-and-line, only

___   Pacific halibut, caught US waters

___   Sablefish / Black cod – wild, Alaska and British Columbia; California, Oregon and Washington have an Acceptable rating for the sustenance of the fishery. They are second choice. Sablefish should also be used to substitute for “Unagi”, freshwater eel, in sushi and other Japanese recipes, as Unagi is in jeopardy. Season: fresh is May – October. Frozen, all year.

___   Salmon – wild, Alaska

___   Pacific sardines, US waters only

___   Rainbow trout – farmed in US, only

Acceptable for the moment:

___   Alaska pollock as fish, not when processed as fake krab, surimi etc.

___   Salmon, wild – from north of Cape Falcon, Oregon (but Washington catch is high in mercury – so don’t eat often — none of this Washington state catch is for kids or if pregnant).

Here are a few special recipes from Monterey Bay Aquarium species which are sustainable and responsibly produced and harvested.

Find out about the status of the fisheries in your nation. The statements above are from the US, but highlight that there definitely are problems in parts of the world, especially where fish are being farmed or where there are little or no laws about pollution.

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Arctic Char, like Trout, is a cousin of Salmon. As such all sub-species have great Omega-3 profiles. Feel free to use them all year. Whole Foods and good health stores will carry it. Ask the fishmonger in your regular supermarket if they can order it, too.

ARCTIC  CHAR WITH FENNEL AND ORANGE

Serves: 4

4 med fennel bulbs, trimmed, cut lengthwise into 1-inch wide wedges, some fronds minced and reserved for garnish
2 lg red onions, peeled, cut through the stem end into 1-inch wide wedges
2 T olive oil, plus more as needed
4 t grated orange zest (from about 3 oranges), divided
1¾ t fennel seeds, crushed coarsely in mortar with pestle if desired, divided
coarse kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
4 Arctic char fillets, 5-6 ounces each
1/4 C balsamic vinegar
1/4 C fresh orange juice
2 t firmly packed brown sugar

Arrange one rack in the upper third of your oven and one rack in the lower third of the oven, then preheat to 450º F.

Combine the fennel wedges and onions in a large bowl, and then add the 2 tablespoons of the oil, 1 1/2 teaspoons of the orange zest, and 1 teaspoon of the fennel seeds. Toss to coat the vegetables. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and toss again.

Arrange vegetables in a single layer on a large, rimmed baking sheet, then place on the upper oven rack. Roast for 15 minutes.

Stir the vegetables and continue roasting until tender and beginning to brown, which will be about 15 minutes longer.

In the meantime, brush a small, rimmed baking sheet with olive oil. Also brush the skin of the fish with olive oil. Place skin side down on the prepared baking sheet. Brush on more olive oil to the  top of the fish and sprinkle with salt, pepper, 1 1/2 teaspoons of the orange zest and remaining ¾ teaspoon of fennel seeds.

After the vegetables have roasted for 20 minutes, place the pan with the fish on the lower oven rack and cook the fish until it feels springy when pressed in the center. This will take  about 8-10 minutes, depending on the thickness of the fish.

Another test of doneness: make a small incision in the thickest part of the fish. The flesh should be just opaque in the center. If it’s still translucent, then cook it a few minutes longer.

While the fish is cooking, mix the vinegar, orange juice, brown sugar and remaining 1 teaspoon grated orange zest in a large skillet. Stir until the sugar dissolves, and then simmer over medium heat until thickened to a syrupy texture.  Stir it frequently, for about 3 minutes, then remove from the heat.

Divide the vegetables and fish among 4 pre-warmed plates, saving the juices from the fish pan. Next, stir 3-4 teaspoons of the fish juices into the balsamic sauce. Spoon all of the sauce over the fish and vegetables. Sprinkle lightly with chopped fennel fronds and serve immediately.

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PACIFIC COD CHOWDER

Serves: 4

4  slices applewood-smoked “bacon” (1/4 pound), chopped (optional)*
1 lg onion, chopped
2 bay leaves
1 t minced fresh thyme
1/4 t paprika
(3) 8-ounce bottles clam juice OR fish broth
1/2 C spring or filtered water
1 pound organic Yukon gold potatoes, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch pieces **
1/2 C  organic whipping cream **
coarse kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
1 1/2 pounds Pacific cod, cut in 1-inch pieces
1 med bunch organic kale finely chopped (about 2 cups) **

If using, cook the “bacon” in a heavy large pot over medium heat until brown and crisp, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the bacon to a paper towel and drain.

Add the onion, bay leaves and thyme to the pot. Sauté over medium heat until the onion is tender, about 5 minutes. Stir in the paprika. Add the clam juice or broth, 1/2 cup water and then the potatoes. Bring the mixture to a low boil. Reduce heat to medium, cover and simmer until the potatoes are just tender, about 8 minutes.

Next, add the cream and bacon to the chowder. Sprinkle the cod pieces with salt and pepper then add the cod and kale to the soup. Simmer until the fish is opaque in the center (to check, cut into a piece of fish with a small knife or break apart with a spoon), stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes.

Only after you are sure that the fish IS cooked, then taste and adjust the seasonings. Ladle the chowder into warmed bowls and serve.

NOTES:
* It’s optional to use “bacon” of any sort. Frankly, it just overwhelms the taste of the fish! But, if you want a vegetarian version, then use a soy “bacon” substitute. It gives a little flavor without being overwhelming, and it keeps the dish kosher, too.

** These 2 vegetables and the cream MUST BE ORGANIC! Why?

Regular potatoes are covered in fungicides.

Regular kale is often grown in polluted fields to draw-out the pollutants!

All fatty dairy products harbor environmental toxins unless they are organically-produced, with care.

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PACIFIC COD TACOS

I personally feel that the Fish Taco is Mexico’s greatest contribution to world-cuisine. I know there are other great Mexican meals, like adobos etc., but this is MY favorite!  Taco del Mar, si!

Serves: 4

Marinated Cod

1/4 C T  olive oil
2 T chopped fresh cilantro
1 1/2 T  fresh lemon juice
1 t  ground achiote* (ground annatto seed) (optional)
1 garlic clove, crushed
1 1/4-1 1/2 pounds Pacific cod

Cumin-Lime Aioli

1/2 C organic  mayonnaise
2 T  cold-pressed, extra-virgin olive oil
1 small garlic clove, finely chopped
1 1/2 T  fresh lemon juice
1 T  fresh lime juice
1/2 t ground cumin
1/4 t  ground coriander
1/4 t  cayenne pepper
pinch of white pepper or freshly ground black pepper
coarse Celtic sea salt

Pico de Gallo

2 med. organic red tomatoes seeded, diced
1 med. organic yellow tomato, diced
1 sm.    red onion, finely chopped
1/3 C  chopped fresh cilantro
2 T  fresh lime juice
2 T  fresh lemon juice
1 T  cold-pressed, extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 jalapeño chile, minced
4 shakes hot pepper sauce (such as Tabasco)

1/2 sm.  head organic red cabbage
8-12 organic corn tortillas
olive oil (for frying)
all-purpose flour

Cooking the Marinated Cod

Combine the oil, cilantro, lemon juice, (achiote) and garlic in a medium bowl. Cut the cod lengthwise into 3 x ¾- inch strips. Add to the marinade and stir to coat. Cover and refrigerate at least 1 hour and up to 2 hours.

Making the Aioli

Combine the mayonnaise, oil, garlic, lemon juice, lime juice, cumin, coriander, cayenne and pepper in a medium bowl and mix to blend. Season to taste with salt. (Can be prepared 2 days ahead; cover and refrigerate.)

For the Pico de Gallo

Combine the red and yellow tomatoes, onion, cilantro, lime juice, lemon juice, olive oil, jalapeno and hot pepper sauce in a medium bowl. Mix to blend. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Cut the cabbage half in thirds through the core. Slice very thinly or shred on a v-slicer or a mandolin.

Warm the tortillas in the oven or on top of the stove.

To warm in the oven, preheat to 250º F. Wrap the tortillas in foil and heat in the oven while cooking the cod.

To heat on top of the stove, working with one tortilla at a time, place directly on a gas burner or hot, dry skillet and cook until beginning to brown in spots, about 20 seconds on each side. Wrap in foil to keep warm.

To Cook the Cod:

Cover the bottom of a heavy large skillet generously with olive oil and warm over medium-high heat.

Place some flour on a medium plate. Working in batches, remove the cod from the marinade, turn in the flour to coat, and add to the skillet (do not crowd).

Cook the cod until crisp, beginning to flake, and opaque in the center, about 3 minutes on each side. (The fish will start to separate into opaque flakes when it’s cooked through.)

Transfer to paper towels and drain. If the browned bits in the skillet become dark brown, pour off the oil, wipe out the skillet and add fresh oil. Sprinkle the cooked cod with salt and pepper.

Arrange 2 or 3 warm tortillas on each plate. Spread each with a little aioli and arrange fish strips in the center. Using a slotted spoon, dress with pico de gallo and top with shredded cabbage. Serve immediately.

*Ground achiote, also called ground annatto seed, is a deep red powder that gives the cod a rich, warm color. It can be found in Latin American, Indian and specialty food stores. Turmeric could also be used and it has real nutritional value as an anti-inflammatory.

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SABLEFISH – GENMAI CHA TEA SOUP

Makes 4 servings
Total Time: 65 minutes

2 C  short-grain organic brown rice
1 t Celtic sea salt, divided
1 package (about 0.8 oz.) toasted, seasoned nori seaweed*
2 green onions
2 t  organic oil
1 pound black cod (about 2 fillets) **
8 tea bags of genmaicha ***
4 C filtered water or spring water
8 more Cups – filtered water
1 t  black sesame seeds (white are 2nd choice)
tamari (a rich, traditionally-made Japanese soy sauce)(optional)
toasted sesame oil

In a medium saucepan, bring rice, 1/2 tsp. salt and 4 cups water to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to a simmer, and cook until rice is tender to the bite, about 50 minutes — or use a rice cooker using their proportions for the amount of water needed for 2C rice (dry). Remove rice from heat, uncover, and fluff with a fork.

Meanwhile, cut nori into 1/4-inch strips and set aside. Slice green onions crosswise (including green parts) and set aside.

Preheat broiler.

Rub a baking sheet with oil.

Put fish on sheet and turn over to oil both sides. Sprinkle with remaining 1/2 tsp. salt. Broil 3 to 4 inches away from broiler until cooked through (flesh flakes easily and is opaque in the center), about 5 minutes. Transfer fish to a plate and set aside.

When rice is cooked, bring 8 cups water to a boil in a saucepan. In a large teapot, measuring cup, or pitcher, pour the boiling water over tea bags. Let steep 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, put 1 cup rice in each of 4 large soup bowls. Place 1/2 fish fillet on each bed of rice. Pour 2 cups hot tea over each. Sprinkle with green onion and black sesame seeds. Serve immediately, with bowls of nori, tamari, and sesame oil on the side.

* Nori is the green-black seaweed used to wrap sushi rolls. It is easy to cut into strips with kitchen shears. Nori, tamari and sesame oil will all be available in a good health store.

** try to choose fillets of even thickness.

*** Genmai Cha comes in boxes in Asian (especially Japanese) markets. It is a green tea paired with roasted rice grains. It has a delicate, nutty flavor.

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REFERENCE WITH RECIPES:
Omega 3 for Diabetics – Part 1
Omega 3 Foods for Diabetics – Part 2
Diabetics Need Omega 3 – Part 3
Omega 3 Helps Diabetes – Part 4

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar. The extra page links are at the bottom of the first page.

You can also sign-up for email alerts for when I post to this blog. I try for once a week. The form is on the upper right of the side-bar. Thanks.

(c)2011 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

Back to Basics for a heatwave hit America this week. You need healthy diabetic beverages and that means NO soda pop in any form!

Three years ago, I posted my original recipe for Em’s Honest Lemonade, along with an important article. I’ll link to that so you can read the information, but I’ll cut and paste my recipe with new suggestions, here.

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Em’s Alkalizing “Honest Lemonade”(c)

1 bottle Minute Maid Premium Lemon Juice* OR juice of 7 organic lemons

2T   agave syrup **

1T   organic maple syrup, Grade B ***

4 C   alkaline water: either Evamor or Essentia or Vivo  (Dasani as a far last choice), chilled

ice cubes (optional when serving, but they water it down)

fresh mint (optional)

This recipe makes about 40 ozs, so choose the appropriate size pitcher or bottle.

Combine all the ingredients and stir well. Chill. Taste when cold and adjust sweetening, if needed, but err on it being not super-sweet! You should want the lemon to be the primary flavor.
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Other (mostly pH alkaline) organic foods to add to my Honest Lemonade are:

___   Key Lime slices or juice and Mint
___   pureed watermelon
___   culinary-grade dry lavender or fresh lavender leaf – just for flavor
___   equal parts lemonade, peach juice (nectar), green tea (cold)
___   fresh blackberry puree with a sage leaf
___   honeydew puree and kiwi
___   strained fresh raspberry juice
___   ginger root thin sliced with fresh pear puree
___   guava juice and papaya
___   papaya puree

When you add the fruit, add the agave or maple syrup last. Hopefully, you will not need any extra sweetening from them.

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* Minute Maid Premium Lemon Juice comes in a small, yellow plastic bottle in the freezer section and it is PURE lemon juice, with no sugars added. It is not organic. Do NOT use cans of frozen concentrate in the freezer as these have lots of sugar added!

Read about Vivo water. I found it to be excellently hydrating when I was using it first, in 1994. Vivo – clustered water from Dr. Lee Lorenzen

** Agave Nectar is the sweet, yet excellently low-glycemic syrup which comes from the agave cactus plant. It is helpful for diabetics and is a natural sweetener. I never use synthetic sweeteners! However it is a highly acidic pH food, which means use just a little or balance it with alkaline foods (lemon and alkaline waters, as in this recipe).

Learn more at: Madhava Agave

I use the Amber version. Agave has a glycemic index of 46; honey is 58 and glucose (like sucrose – table sugar type) is 100; the lower the number the better it is for you. Never use high fructose corn syrup, for anything.

*** Organic Maple Syrup, Grade B has all the minerals still intact, whereas “Grade A” does not. This is one case where B is better for you! This amount of maple syrup should not be a problem, but check your own blood readings. Getting organic is important, as otherwise “regular” maple syrup is a very high pesticide produced food, bad for the land and bad for you.

Use the lemonade to help you keep cool. Do monitor your blood levels. Even the stress from the heat can effect your biochemistry and blood sugar levels.

Here’s the link to the original article with extra information:

Em’s Alkalizing Honest Lemonade.

I’ll resume the diabetic gardening series next week.

Best to all — Em

(c)2010  Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

If you want to share any more than 2 short paragraphs of my article, please write for permission at the About Me page above on the Navigation Bar. Thanks!

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

Yes, I know it’s Thanksgiving in America in 2 days, but my post and recipe is one for you to incorporate, even daily, as much as possible, the way the longest-lived peoples do. That’s really something to be Thankful for!

So, find a way to start this food in your diet over the 4 day holiday week-end. You won’t be sorry. The more I learn about seaweed, iodine and the complex, healing polysaccharides which it contains, the more amazed I am.

Seaweed is really the Foundational Food of Life.

This low glycemic, high nutrition food has no calories and lots of fiber, wonderful mineral content, along with great, clean taste.

The Iodine and Fucoidan in seaweed will help you to:
___ reduce weight
___ remineralize especially when stressed
___ aid thyroid and metabolic health
___ help to reduce blood sugar levels and body-wide inflammation
___ help to prevent excessive blood clotting
___ automatically thin your blood
___ protect bone marrow and kidneys
___ support healthy joint activity
___ engage your immune functions and fire-up your T cell-mediated and natural killer (NK) cells for effective anti-viral (including AIDS and herpes) and anti-cancer protection.

Yes, it’s that amazing and effective in the right quantities.

Introduce your children to this pH alkaline, life-giving food, too. Start them on better habits than you had. In the 1950’s Americans used to eat 4 times as much iodine as they do now! This current lack is probably behind most of the massive rise in chronic diseases and conditions, like diabetes, heart disease and cancer, especially breast cancer and prostate cancer.

You just cannot spend your food money more wisely than to buy organic seaweed from one of the firms which carefully source where and how it was grown. These companies are listed in the previous parts which I mention below.

I now add Mitoku Brand – Japanese foods, with some organic seaweeds to the list. Sorry I forgot you; it’s a great company, which I have also used for years and years.

Please read these articles before continuing, if you have not already been following the series.

Diabetics – Iodine and Health, Part 1
Diabetics – Iodine and Health, Part 2
Diabetics – Iodine and Health, Part 3 – includes recipe

Do NOT buy any Chinese-sourced seaweed. Assays have shown that the unrelenting pollution of their air, sea and water has resulted in arsenic in their seaweed products.

Dr. Ray Sahelian, MD states: “Fucoidan substances are sulfated polysaccharides extracted from brown algae (seaweed). Fucoidan has been studied for its diverse biological activities. It appears this substance has blood thinning properties and has an influence on the immune system.”

He continues: “Fucoidan (sulfated alpha-L-fucan) is a sulfated polysaccharide and is found primarily in the cell walls of several species of brown seaweed, such as kombu, limu moui, wakame (and mekabu), hijiki and bladderwrack.”

Most of the clinical immune research has been done on animals, using wakame and also on its special structure called mekabu (available from Eden Foods). Mekabu is the green crunchy plant in seaweed salad in sushi restaurants. See the sketch of the wakame fronds and the mekabu spiral structure, just above the life-giving holdfast support.

My discussion is all about getting these wonderful ingredients only in food, not in supplements. There’s very little human research (if any) in the amounts and concentrations placed in supplements, whereas, there are tens of thousands of years of normal, daily ingestion of these seaweeds as food, in normal appetite portions.

One teaspoon of a powdered seaweed is equivalent to eating a whole plate of seaweed. It takes about 40 pounds of seaweed to make one pound of powdered product.

The oldest Japanese recipes do not call for seaweed to be cooked (for varieties tender enough to eat this way). This may be healthier as science shows, that unlike Iodine, Fucoidan is disrupted by heat.

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from http://epicureandebauchery.blogspot.com

Seaweed Preserve (nori no tsukudani)

5 sheet nori (seaweed like the one used for sushi)
2 cups sake in 1/2 cup increments
1/2-1 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup mirin (Japanese sweet rice wine)
1/8 cup toasted sesame seeds **

1. Tear up all the nori into approximately 2 inch x 2 inch pieces
2. Pour first 1/2 cup sake into a small pan on medium heat *
3. Add nori and cook until almost all of the sake is absorbed
4. Repeat until 1 1/2 cups of sake is almost all absorbed
5. Add soy sauce, mirin, and sesame seeds
6. Add last 1/2 cup of sake
7. Cook until all of the liquid is absorbed and the seaweed has a very thick consistency.
8. Keep in an air tight container in the fridge.

Use over rice, on top of salads, over fish etc.,
For an Ochazuke:
1) For each 1/2 cup cooked brown rice, use 2 tbs seaweed preserve and 1 tsp wasabi paste, 1/4 tsp ume paste.
2) Pour on hot sencha tea, brewed strong.
3) Enjoy right away after mixing with your spoon!

* Frankly, I am going to try this recipe with just letting the seaweed absorb the incremental amounts of sake and other liquids without cooking, and see if it will absorb enough over time. No harm in trying it this way; I can always cook it a little at the end. I saw another wakame recipe that just used a no-cook absorption method, so it is possible and will keep more of the beneficial fucoidan.

** I never toast seeds; they lose too much nutrition, even on low heats. Use white and // or black sesame seeds.
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Links:
This store carries Mitoku’s full line. Mitoku’s full inventory of products available online

Enjoy! More next week. Have a safe and happy holiday!
Best to all — Em

P.S. Please share this with your favorite social media site. To read more articles, please use the Title Archive tab on the upper navigation bar. Please subscribe to my blog on the right side-bar.

(c)2009 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com
If you desire to use or quote more than a couple of sentences from my article, please write for permission to the About Me page on the upper navigation bar. Please include the address of the site where you wish to use it. Thanks!

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

If I just had a chance to grab 3 or 4 supplements in an emergency, to help keep my Health and to prolong my life, Iodine containing foods would be one of them (or a special supplement, I mention in the prior articles below). Yes, Iodine is that important.

Iodine is especially essential for diabetics. Indeed, it is essential for everyone, as most people are definitely deficient.

Read my first two articles  so you can be up to speed on the “why” of Iodine.

Iodine and Health for Everyone – Part 1

Iodine and Health – Part 2

Now that you’ve done that reading, let’s continue with some ways to use seaweeds, the most iodine-rich, alkaline food.

___ I use powdered Kombu seaweed to make soups with a creamy-rich texture without the dairy or less-nutritious thickeners. I sprinkle it in stews to make a thicker, more nutritious sauce than flour, arrowroot or cornstarch would give. Ditto for salad dressing. I sneak it into baked goods or pancakes. Luckily, Iodine is not harmed by heat. I use it as a topper for rice, along with other choices. It has a pleasant sea flavor which is not aggressive or strange. Use it to substitute for salt in any savory smoothie. Sneak a little into some other smoothies. Add some to pickled foods. You have to be inventive as most modern western cookbooks won’t have seaweed recipes.

___ I use a lot of Japanese recipes. Their cooks are the masters of seaweed cuisine, and it goes way beyond just wraps for sushi. You’ll also find recipes in Welsh books (as laver), in Macrobiotic cookbooks and in many other cuisines on a varying scale. In these recipes, I use the real sheets of seaweed.

___ You can also make your own version of Gomashio, a shelf stable condiment using Celtic sea salt and organic ingredients.

Seaweed has virtually no calories, is rich in fiber as well as Iodine and it has just about every needed trace mineral known to humankind.

Here is an adaptable recipe.
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Em’s Kaisou Salada Serves 4

Make ahead:
5 grams ( 1/8 oz.) EACH dried wakame, dried arame and dried hijiki seaweeds I use only Eden Foods brand, as they source their organic seaweeds carefully.

1) In two separate bowls, soak the arame and hijiki together for 30 minutes, and in the other bowl, soak the wakame for 10 minutes.

130 grams (4 ozs.) enokitake mushrooms (tiny white mushrooms with long stems — in good supermarkets refrigerated or Asian produce section) (optional)

2) Trim the hard stems off each bunch of mushroom stalks, divide the bundles, keeping the mushrooms intact and whole.

2 scallions (spring onions, green onions) and ice water with cubes

3) Cut the onions into 1 1/2″ long thin strips and plunge into the ice water so they curl up.

1/2 English cucumber, cut lengthwise, cut into thin, half-moon slices

1 bunch of red radishes, washed and sized as desired. (Also, wash the leaves and dry them. Use for soups or stir frys.) OR use a desired amount of white icicle (daikon) radish

4) Cook the wakame and enokitake mushrooms in boiling water for 2 minutes. Add the arame and hijiki for a few seconds and immediately remove from the heat and then drain.

5) Transfer to a bowl. Sprinkle on marinade from 1 1/4 teaspoon of Celtic sea salt and 15 ml (1 Tablespoon) organic brown rice vinegar while the weeds and mushroom mix is still warm. Then, chill everything in the refrigerator.

Salad Assembling:

Make the salad Dressing:
60 ml (4 Tablespoons) organic brown rice vinegar
7.5 ml (1 1/2 teaspoons) organic toasted sesame oil
15 ml (1 Tablespoon) organic shoyu or tamari soy sauce
1 Tablespoon water (with a pinch of dashi-no-moto powder, if desired)
2.5cm (1 inch) piece of fresh ginger root, finely grated (or slivered)

1 package fresh washed organic Mesclun mixed spring greens
organic sesame seeds and // or organic hemp seeds

1) Place greens in a large bowl, add cucumber and radish slices, then top with the seaweed-enokitake mixture. Garnish with the spring onion curls and the seeds and then serve each portion with some dressing, just before eating.

Additional Options:
___ 12 cooked tiger prawns, cooled
___ 4 – 6ozs. of steamed, then cooled cold-water, ocean fish fillet, per person e.g. cod, halibut, sardines, Atlantic pollock, haddock.
___ up to 1 1/2 teaspoons of superfine sugar or equal amount of low glycemic agave nectar to the salad dressing
___ add lightly steamed carrot slices or fully steamed sweet potato cubes
___ fresh dill or fresh cilantro (for detoxification and flavor)

Enjoy!
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This is delightful pH alkaline food.

Best to all — Em

P.S. Please share this with your favorite social media site. To read more articles, please use the Title Archive tab on the upper navigation bar. Please subscribe to my blog on the right side-bar.

(c)2009 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com
If you desire to use or quote more than a couple of sentences from my article, please write for permission to the About Me page on the upper navigation bar. Please include the address of the site where you wish to use it. Thanks!

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