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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

I can’t believe that it’s Thanksgiving in one week and Hanukkah begins December 1. That has really caught me off-guard. I already have a husband who’s ill with some kind of influenza, it seems, and I am trying to get him on-the-mend. Everything is always in flux; now it’s even more so. What to do? How can diabetics weather the peaks and valleys and stresses of this spate of seasonal celebrations?

I do it by being organized, which is why it’s a little more scary this year. Another thing I do is trust to my experience, which I will definitely need this year. One more tip, is that I am always paying attention and gathering through the year. I never wait until just Holiday Time.

So, I took my husband to the clinic 2 days ago and will bring him back today.  Hopefully, the physician will see some progress, as we really want to avoid him getting pneumonia from the grungy, small cough that appeared 2 weeks ago, just after he got his flu shot.  It has just slowly progressed to show some lung changes on Wednesday’s  x-ray. So, yesterday, I made him a mighty healing soup.

I am including the recipe here, as I do not want you to get ill if you stress or obsess over the holidays. My soup recipe will help give your immune system the ammunition it needs to kick into high-gear.

My husband is not diabetic, but has other health issues which I have to be careful of, too, which share diabetics’ usual “concerns”.

As Hippocrates said, “Let Food Be Thy Medicine“. That’s a treatment your body knows how to use and you have to be knowledgeable these days or get counsel. I have been taught by family experience and my own use of Food As Cure has been for multiple decades. Now that I am without medical insurance, it’s even more critical knowledge.

One consistent place to find a tradition of using Food As Cure, is in the Chinese Culture. You will be able to find many recipes, some of which may have been used as food cures for thousands of years. I have many Chinese Food Cure books on my shelves, and hopefully you have some family traditions, too.

Many of the things called “old wives tales” in the past are being shown to have a solid basis when science catches up. The grandmothers and mothers of the past were the Healers, and they were good at observing what worked. Even what we think of now as “witchcraft” and “herbalism” were female scientific endeavors which males either didn’t understand or didn’t like handing over any Power to a woman. That’s true, let’s face it.

But, now, it is everyone’s responsibility to be a Healer — and that’s especially true when American medicine and much of western medicine is going in the wrong direction, becoming a spineless shill for Big Pharma. If you can find a more holistic physician, you are lucky.

I’ll be suspending my series about a few of the good doctors out there while we talk about the holidays, and I may resume the series sometime on the New Year. I will return to a couple of the first few physicians, too, Dr. Timothy Harlan, MD, especially, who is just starting to produce a TV series, so he may get wider exposure as “Dr. Gourmet”.

Pay attention to whom you get counsel from, but be proactive and DO learn what you need to know.

Now, on to today’s recipe.

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Em’s Mighty Healing Soup

For 4 servings — in a large soup pot, combine:

1 1/2 cartons of free-range, organic chicken broth – about 1 1/2 quarts

1 medium sweet potato, scrubbed, peeled, diced in 1/2″ slices

1 medium Yukon Gold potato, scrubbed well with peel on, 1/2″ dice

3 large beet leaves and stems, shredded, then diced 1/2″ lengths

about 1/2t  each of dried: garlic powder*, turmeric, oregano, thyme

1/4 C Turkish red lentils, rinsed

1 large piece of kombu seaweed (Eden brand)

1 large piece of Nori seaweed, (Eden Brand)

Add these and bring to the boil, then immediately reduce heat and simmer for approximately 30 minutes.

Then add:

1/2 C well washed organic quinoa

(1)  20+ ounce can organic diced tomatoes (Muir Glen Brand^)

Cook another 10-15 minutes once the pot has returned to heat. You may have to turn it up to boil again and immediately return it then to a good simmer.

Because I kept the heat low for most of the time, I did not need to stand and stir the soup. In fact, I just kept an eye on it while I did more things in the kitchen.

At the end, place the following in a bowl:

about 1 t – 2t of organic extra-virgin olive oil (bowl size determines how much to use)

same amount of Organic, apple cider vinegar with the “mother” enzymes (Eden or Bragg’s or Spectrum Brand)

a tiny pinch of Celtic Sea Salt

splash of lemon juice

about 1/4t Kelp Granules (Maine Sea Vegetables Brand)

Pour in the desired amount of soup and enjoy!

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* I will be explaining why I use each ingredient, and I want to say that I will also be adding fresh garlic cloves next time, and I had wanted to add finely diced fresh onion as garnish, but had used my last one! Onions provide quercetin, an important factor.

If you take coumadin or warfarin or another blood thinner, then pay attention as seaweed will affect your numbers. Seaweed is Nature’s blood thinner. You will need less medicine if you use seaweed regularly. See my previous articles about Seaweed, and Iodine, in the Titles Archive, above.

Many of the ingredients that you can’t find in your local stores, especially if you live outside the United States, you can buy at the companies’ websites.

___ Free-range Organic Chicken Broth – is the best form of “Jewish penicillin”. Science has found many immune-stimulating or modulating substances in chicken soup — as Jewish Mamas have always known!

___   organic sweet potato – this is a very alkaline pH food which will help to “neutralize” some of the pH acidic tissues which is where pathogens hide. Viruses and bacteria require an acidic pH environment to live. If you remain pH alkaline, you are not a host. Sweet potatoes also have good fiber to try to help the gut keep moving even though you may not be physically active as much, if unwell. They are filled with pro-Vitamin A phytosterols which help your body to fight (and protect your eyes).

___   organic Yukon Gold Potato (or white potato) – again, another pH alkaline food, if eaten with the skin and there’s actually a fair amount of Vitamin C in them, too.

___   organic beet greens – these dark green leafies have lots of Vitamin B’s to help us handle stress, which being ill certainly is. They also have lots of Vitamin A which is being covered up by their dark color. I was also hoping that there’s still naturally-occurring nitrates in the leaves and stems, not just the beet bulb. Natural nitrates help to produce nitrous oxide, needed to dilate your vascular system which means more oxygen can be brought deeply into tissues. Oxygen is another “killer” of most pathogens – which tend to be anaerobic organisms. (Natural nitrates are very different as opposed to man-made ones in deli meats, which are cancer-causing.)

___   specific dry herbs: garlic, thyme, oregano and turmeric are all either antivirals, antibacterials or both.  Don’t underestimate the power of these plants. They’ve been used by herbalists for millennia because they work. Science is now just catching up. Fresh herbs are best, but you can use dried to lesser effect.

___   Turkish red lentils – these are acidic pH, as all beans are, in varying degrees, but I needed to add more protein to help tissues repair themselves in the battle with the pathogens, so the pH alkaline foods will help neutralize these beans, too. I chose these lentils because they cook very quickly, but true French green lentils have some remarkable qualities, due to the volcanic soil they are grown in, so I might consider using them, too.

___   organic seaweeds — I used kombu and nori – large leaf portions. They provide Iodine, an essential anti-viral and anti-bacterial and also the full range of minerals. The key here is to use a brand like Eden which is fastidious about the cleanliness and safety of the ocean water where these are harvested. Do not buy Chinese products.

___   organic quinoa — a high protein food to aid tissue renewal and it’s a very alkaline food to help raise pH to levels where pathogens cannot survive. It is also the original alkaline fast-food, as it cooks in about 10 minutes. Use it as a substitute for grains, all of which are pH acidic foods.

___   organic tomatoes — source of lycopene and lutein — important phytonutrients to help with immunity and eye health, and there’s some Vitamin C, but, again, that’s being lost when exposed to heating — so I try to keep the cooking temperature as low as possible and add the Vitamin C foods as late in the process as possible. ^ I use Muir Glen because it has an enameled interior to the can. Most companies use Bispenol A treated liners for canned food, especially tomatoes, which are sub-acidic fruits and can corrode the can. Bisphenol A is now banned in Canada and should be, everywhere. Children, especially, should not be exposed to Bisphenol A.

___   olive oil — source of important essential fatty acids and it’s a healthy food to help with joint pain and heart health — both of which are stressed when dealing with the flu. I prefer organic, but that can be hard to find. Make sure the oil is in a dark glass bottle, and buy a small size. Keep refrigerated or in a cool spot.

___   organic apple cider vinegar with the “mother of vinegar” enzymes — it leaves alkaline ash, so it is considered to bring alkalinity in your body. It is the only vinegar which does this. This vinegar is very good for diabetics and it it aids digestion, so the food value is more available with less work for the ill person

___   Celtic Sea Salt — supplies the full range of ocean minerals, and it is the only one which is assured to have been harvested in truly pristine ocean waters. Get it at Trader Joe’s or from the original preferred source – The Grain and Salt Society. Look them up in Asheville, NC.

___   splash of organic lemon juice – again, lemons may have citric acid, but they leave alkaline ash after metabolism is complete, so they are an alkalizer. Of course they are also a source of Vitamin C, but it is best not exposed to heat. You’re better off having a  real, organic lemon squeezed into pure spring water to drink before your soup or along side – sweeten with a little stevia.

___   kelp granules — more iodine in an easy to use anywhere, anytime format. Even though heat does not deactivate Iodine, I wanted some fresh, just at serving. Iodine is a potent pathogen killer.

Put some of my Mighty Healing Soup into a thermos to take to work if your co-workers are hacking and coughing. And, if you decide to take an Echinacea preparation, which IS effective (contrary to the “science” “reported” in the media where it is being “studied” for “off-label” uses), then be sure to take Echinacea for a maximum of 2 weeks on, then 2 weeks off. Your thymus has to rest and not be constantly stimulated. The traditional use adheres to that timetable and Russian research confirms that wisdom.

Well, I hope you stay well, and we’ll see if I get a post done next week — maybe on Friday. Have a great Thanksgiving!

Best to all — Em

Please use my Titles Archive Tab on the upper navigation bar to learn lots more!

(c)2010 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please respect my copyright. You can use 2 short paragraphs, but to quote more, please write for permission at the About Me tab above. Thanks.

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

I want to wish everyone a Happy Hanukkah, which begins Friday December 11 at sundown and lasts until December 19 at sundown. I encourage you to learn about Hanukkah in the interest of peaceful co-existence. Please read: Hanukkah – Humanity’s First Defense of Religious Liberty. I am not writing more about Hanukkah now as I am sharing an important series about Iodine and want it to move along as much as possible.

Because I have some unexpected family obligations (due to a death in my new extended family), I may be writing this post in sections, so check back! The post may even end abruptly at times, until I finally finish it.

If you haven’t read the earlier parts of this series, do so right now. You couldn’t spend the time more wisely than to learn about Iodine. It IS that important to your Health. You can’t spend your food money more wisely, either. Read here.

Diabetics – Iodine and Health 1
Diabetics – Iodine and Health 2
Diabetics – Iodine and Health 3
Diabetics – Iodine and Health 4
Diabetics – Iodine and Health 5

In this edition, let’s learn a bit more about individual seaweeds and I will include at least one recipe. Seaweeds?! I can hear many of you saying “EEEWH!” but, really,  they taste wonderful!

Seaweeds and sea vegetables are an important part of any diabetic food plan, although you may not have heard that from your dietician, nutritionist or diabetes educator or physician. Why is that?

Well, Iodine has slipped under the radar; as our consumption of it has fallen over the last 50 years, more “chronic” and acute diseases have risen. Only now are savvy researchers and physicians making the “connection” that our Health is being seriously lost due to iodine deficiency. Of course, doctors in prior centuries understood Iodine’s importance and used it as a universal healing substance, and rightly so.

The longest-lived peoples, like the Okinawans, eat seaweed, sea veggies, ocean fish and shellfish (the only animals having high concentrations of the Iodine you need).  The healthiest populations e.g. the Japanese eat plenty of iodine-rich foods, daily, too.

Several of the Amazon tribes in Peru and Ecuador travel 2 months of the year, leaving their mountains to head to the coast where the tribes gather seaweed and return with it to their rainforest home, (where their shaman / doctor uses the seaweed (iodine) to keep them healthy). Now, that’s a commitment, mountainous trekking and walking and hauling for 2 months!

So, let’s learn more about these miraculous plants. All seaweeds are edible, but not all are tasty or have a texture that is soft enough to eat. There is also a seasonality to harvesting seaweed. For example, the best kombu is harvested during the winter, and most of the others are harvested in spring. Some are able to be harvested all year around.

Some species are not cultured and must be gathered from the wild. Others are mari-cultured in shallow seawater bays or deeper ocean settings. Nori, which is used for sushi wrappers, has been cultured for a long time, and is the only seaweed which flourishes in quieter currents. Wakame is more recently being farmed. Other seaweeds need stronger currents to thrive.

Only buy organic seaweeds, as seaweeds take up so much from the water around them. Seaweeds are a low glycemic food, as well as being a pH alkaline food. They have lots of fiber, vitamins and minerals and have no calories. Yes, no calories. As they are a vegetable, they have no cholesterol.

Land foods contain rarely any iodine, which is vital for your metabolism, your weight, your thyroid gland and SO much more!

The amount of iodine put in “iodized” salt or which is in my favorite whole sea salts is NOT enough. The naturally-occurring iodine in sea water is concentrated within the seaweeds and sea veggies, so they become a nutritious source for us and for ocean fish.

And, furthermore, the RDA nutritional daily target for iodine is set too low at .15mg. Research shows that Health requires MUCH more, as the Japanese, Okinawans and others eat that higher amount daily, safely in food. It is important not to eat too much as it is to make sure you do not have too little. Use Japanese and Okinawan food patterns and portions as your guide.

Sea vegetables have been harvested for food and medicine for thousands of years; in fact, early records show the Chinese used aquatic plants for medicinal purposes as early as 3,000 B.C. Wakame has long been an important source of high-quality protein, lipids, minerals (such as calcium), and vitamins A, B1, B2 and C in many Asian food cultures, especially as most Asians have severe lactose intolerance, so dairy calcium sources were never used by them.

KOMBU:
This is the most honored of the seaweeds which the Japanese use, as it is the one used to make Dashi, a foundational liquid in all Japanese cooking. The first soaked liquid contains about 60% iodine and when the kombu is used for “second” dashi stock, then the kombu releases much less of its remaining iodine content, but it still has more than most other foods, even at that stage.

Konbu (kombu) grows in the cold currents and is ready to harvest in the winter.  It only grows in cooler waters, such as around the island of Hokkaido. In fact, the tastiest kombu comes from the coldest currents. The longest seaweed is Naga Konbu which is grown in Hidaka, a region in Hokkaido, and it can grow naturally to lengths in excess of 20 meters (at least 60 foot strands).

Kombu has glutamic acid for umami (“savory” flavor). 1st and 2nd year kelp is very different nutritionally and in thickness of the leaves. Kombu kelp fronds drop off after its first year, and a new and superior frond grows the second year. Most of the market is cheap first-year kelp, but you will know which is superior 2nd year as it is 5x the price.

The best tasting kombu is Rishiri Konbu which is named for the area it is grown in Hokkaido, Rishiri-tou. The next best is Hidaka Konbu from Hidaka, Hokkaido. The majority of harvested kombu grows in Hokkaido at a length of between 60cm and 2m.

Kombu makes beans more digestible when cooked along with them.
It is sold in plastic packages as dry strips which have a white covering; this is the Umami (the essence of the flavor, which is a “savory” taste).

This seaweed is reconstituted by being soaked, or heated gently in water (it should not be boiled). In addition to being combined with dry tuna shavings to make dashi stock, there is also a tradition of using kombu to wrap around fish in order to impart its flavor on the fish. This technique is called, “Kobujime”.

Kombu itself is a difficult food to digest and must therefore be cooked for a very long time in order for you to be able to eat it. Usually, instead of being eaten in its own right, it is valued for its depth of flavor and nutrition in soups and Japanese stews (nabe). The shavings of konbu, called “Tororu Konbu” are used to flavor tsuyu (a dipping sauce) or applied to rice balls (onigiri).

It is also eaten as tsukudani, a dish where the kombu is boiled for three hours in soy sauce, mirin (Japanese rice wine) and dashi stock OR after cooking, the kombu can also be cut up into small strips then pickled with vegetables.

Continuing on with the article, after a few days’ hiatus …

NORI:

Also is famous as the wrap around sushi. It is also known as “Laver” in Britain and is used to make Welsh Laver Bread. This seaweed only grows in sheltered, quiet current waters in a similar manner to moss, adhering itself to other objects in the sea. It is now mariculture farmed using nets for it to grow on. It is very important for the waters to be pure, as anything bad in the environment is not flushed away readily. The algae used to make Nori grows on the surface of the sea using huge nets. In fact, 230 square miles of Japan’s coast line is dedicated solely to the production of Nori. Over 300,000 tons of Nori is produced every year.  Organic nori is available from the suppliers mentioned in my other articles.

Nori is sold in sheets with a very similar consistency to rice paper and even though its most well-known use is to make sushi rolls (maki-sushi), it can also be eaten as tsukudani. It can be dissolved in water and mixed with kanten (agar-agar, another seaweed) to form a firm gelled shape which is then used as a decoration for sashimi (raw fish).

Nori is lower in iodine, and so it can be just safely eaten in normal quantities without worrying about excessive dietary intake even in the Japanese and Okinawan levels of high iodine intake.

WAKAME:

Wakame is a brown algae which grows in the warm currents. Its familiar jade-green color is the result of brief blanching after the fronds are harvested and rinsed. Wakame is sold either fresh (it can be eaten just as it is) or in a dried format. Different parts of the wakame plant are used in different ways. The fronds or leaves (“ha”), rib (“kuki” ) and ruffled, bulbous spiral near the base (“mekabu” ) are all edible. Each is enjoyed for its own distinctive flavor and texture.

To rehydrate this seaweed, it takes awhile and requires lots of water. Using around 1 litre / quart of water per 10g of wakame will give it the space to expand fully in a medium size container.

Wakame is a very versatile seaweed which can be eaten hot in soups, cold in salads, with sashimi or as sunomono (a vinegar based salad type of dish).

Seaweeds are harvested in several seasons, but most are harvested in the spring and summer. The best time to eat wakame is in the spring at the same time as the takenoko (bamboo shoots) are out.  A typical, seasonal dish is Wakatake which is the new, bright green wakame and takenoko shoots served together in a clear soup (suimono).

It was only in the 17th century that wakame became available to the commoner Japanese people; prior to that it had been reserved for the nobility. But technology in farming wakame became possible, so more became available.

MEKABU:

This is a specific part of the wakame seaweed plant. It is a floral structure just above the holdfast (which must not be harvested). The Mekabu is a curvy, spiral, leafy structure which many people use for its crunchier texture.  Mekabu is best eaten with citrus or ginger to complement its exceptional, unique flavor. It may be one of the seaweeds used in the lovely crunchy salad used at sushi bars (which mostly is made in China and has coloring — to try to get the original, quality ingredients to make your own*). Others say that Wakame stems (kukiwame) are included in this salad.

* This sushi salad also may contain agar-agar and clear jellyfish. You can find some product frozen or refrigerated especially in Korean markets, but many of these salads are Chinese, so I won’t buy them due to their polluted waters and chemical dyes. The best sourced pre-made one I know about is: Sushi style seaweed salad

AGAR-AGAR // KANTEN:

This product is made from tegusa seaweed and it is tasteless and is not eaten in its own right. Instead, it is boiled and its extract is used as a gelling agent as a vegetarian option instead of animal-based gelatin. Kanten is rich in fiber but has zero calories and is also believed to help lower cholesterol and blood pressure. You will find many recipes for its use in Macrobiotic cookbooks. The food industry uses agar-agar and carrageenan (another seaweed product) in many foods. Read the labels and you’ll be surprised at how often you have already been eating seaweed!

HIJIKI:

A black seaweed which is bought dried and needs to be reconstituted in plenty of water for at least an hour. Then, it should be washed thoroughly before use. It develops a stronger flavour being cooked in oil and is served stir-fried and also simmered with carrots or burdock root. It can be stirfiried or simmered with either abura-age (fried tofu) or meats, and then seasoned with soy sauce. Alternatively, it can be mixed with mashed up tofu and other ingredients such as carrot and shiitake mushrooms, and steamed in a pocket of abura-age (like an inari sushi). It will never actually be as soft as other brown or green seaweeds, but it has a pleasant texture when soaked and simmered.

DULSE:

This seaweed is a unique reddish-brown cordovan color because of all the iron it contains. It is a very good source for vegetarians. When dulse is fried, it is a suitable substitute for bacon. Dulse also makes good “chips” for snacks and bar food.

ARAME:

This seaweed is readily available, but I have not used it.

LESSER KNOWN SEAWEEDS:

MOZUKU

A dark brown seaweed which is eaten with brown rice vinegar as a starter or as a palate refresher. Mozuku is harvested in the spring and 90% of the mozuku eaten in Japan is produced in the southernmost islands of the Rykuyu Islands (known as “Okinawa”). Research is ongoing to study  its anti-cancer properties.

OGONORI

This is a light and delicate seaweed. Ogonori is sold preserved in salt and is refrigerated. This seaweed is only eaten cold, either as a salad vegetable or it is served with sashimi.

AONORI

This is a bright green seaweed which is usually shredded in tiny pieces to act as a garnish and flavor enhancer e.g. top your steamed brown rice with ao nori, or add it just at serving to soups. I love this one.

Aonori is freshwater seaweed collected from the mouths of rivers just in the estuary where freshwater flows into a bay. It has a pleasant, sea-breeze like aroma and flavor. Aonori is a popular garnish for okonomiyaki (Japanese stuffed pancake) and also yakisoba (stir-fried Japanese noodles).

OGO LIMU

This is a Hawaiian lacey, purplish colored seaweed which many say is another of the seaweeds used in the famous crunchy seaweed salad used at Japanese restaurants.

ALARIA // SEA PALM:

This seaweed is moderately available. I haven’t worked with it.

SEA LETTUCE:

It is available off the California coast.  I understand it has a mild flavor and has leaves which are indeed a lot like a lettuce leaf.

SEA GRAPES   (Caulerpa lentillifera). It is a type of green bulbous seaweed which really look like bunched grapes. It is also known as umibudo and green caviar.

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Here is a universal type dressing for seaweed to make a salad.

EM’S SEAWEED SALAD’S DRESSING

You can also get dehydrated, packaged seaweed combinations meant to be used as salad (different than the “crunchy” sushi one described above). This is a leafy salad. You will find these in any good Asian market and in some health stores or use walame or mekabu and kelp following the soaking directions on the packet. Garnish with nori and / or ao nori.

3 T unseasoned, organic brown rice vinegar (get no salt; read labels)
3 T organic soy sauce or tamari
2 T organic sesame oil
1 teaspoon organic brown sugar, or agave nectar (preferred)
1 teaspoon finely grated, washed and peeled fresh ginger root
1/2 teaspoon minced garlic clove
1 T organic sesame seeds
1/2 T  ponzu or lime juice
1/2t citric acid (optional)

Optional: Korean kochu-chang spicy sauce OR red pepper flakes

AND / OR a little mirin (Japanese sake cooking wine), Mentaiko – spicy pollack roe

Thinly sliced English cucumber and the prepared seaweeds

Combine ingredients and incorporate into already soaked, prepared seaweed and cucumber. Use wakame or mekabu or packaged dehydrated seaweed salad mix. Top with roe, if using it.

(c)2009 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com
Please respect my copyright, and if you want to use more than a couple of sentences as a quote, please write to me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar. Thanks!

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

I’ve written five articles on the subject of Iodine because it’s amazingly essential for our Health! How come you haven’t heard about it before? Well, it’s complacency and ignorance in current Public Health circles and in your doctor’s office. The scientific research is quite clear, and you need to take about 20 – 25 minutes to read the other 4 parts in this series, for background. If you are a regular reader, then just continue in this article’s text after these links.

LINKS to the previous articles in the series. Please read first. It won’t take long and your health really does depend on knowing this!

Diabetics – Iodine and Health, Part 1
Diabetics – Iodine and Health, Part 2
Diabetics – Iodine and Health, Part 3
Diabetics – Iodine and Health, Part 4

___ In this edition, as one of the topics, let’s discuss Iodine, Pregnancy and Breastfeeding, first.

Thyroid hormone and your thyroid gland, together with iodine, are the most important factors by far for completion of a normal pregnancy and delivering a normal baby.

Iodine is put into the mother’s milk by the lactating breast to levels that are 30 times the levels in the mother’s blood (your body can only put iodine in your breast milk if you have enough to give). I do not know how much (if any) is put into baby formulas. It would not be the first time that formula-makers have missed an essential ingredient. Maybe the amounts used would help explain the rash of learning “disabilities” and generally lower IQ scores in past decades, as Moms feeding their babies by breast milk has declined.

If you find after delivery or while nursing, that your thyroid has become sluggish and you have ‘low thyroid” symptoms (like fatigue, cold extremities, weight gain etc.), then maybe your body is giving all your Iodine stores to your baby and leaving you with nothing left to operate your thyroid and metabolism with. In those circumstances, your immunity is also put at risk, along with many other possibilities to erode your health. Making sure that you maintain proper Iodine levels for you and your baby is critical. You have to learn what foods are iodine rich and then eat them everyday in normal-size portions.

Iodine has very important functions for your child’s brain development before and after birth.

Iodine deficiency in pregnant or nursing mothers can lead to statistically significant neuro-cognitive deficits in their infants. Lack of iodine creates metabolic havoc and may create irreversible developmental brain damage during gestation and in the first several years of life, according to Peter Laurberg, from Aalborg Hospital in Denmark, and his colleagues. If it is bad enough, your child could become a cretin, which is not reversible.

Just start eating seaweed, daily. It tastes good; it really does. Next week, I’ll include more recipes, but meanwhile, Japanese and Macrobiotic cuisines offer the best chance to find some more recipes, along with Korean and Chinese cuisines, to a lesser extent.

[[Never buy Chinese source seaweed unless you are sure there is NO ecological damage in the area where it is harvested. With China’s pollution, this is almost impossible.]]

And, if you are concerned or interested, then take Dr. Abraham’s Iodine Loading Test to find out your body’s Iodine status (his lab is Optimox). All three labs mentioned below supply their own protocol for details on collection of urine samples, pooling samples for 24 hr. and sending a 2 ounce aliquot to the Laboratory for analysis. It would always be best to confirm that you can take this test when you are already pregnant; I don’t know the answer to that.

Dr. Abraham: OPTIMOX CORPORATION
P.O. Box 3378, Torrance, CA 90510-3378
or Call Toll Free in America: (800) 223-1601
Optimox Iodine Loading Test

If you go through the Hakala Research Lab in Colorado, USA you will not need a doctor’s prescription for this test. Hakala Labs

Labrix Clinical Services Inc. in Oregon City, Oregon, USA is another lab which can do this test for you.
LABRIX CLINICAL SERVICES INC.
619 Madison Street STE 100
Oregon City, OR. 97045
Phone: 1 (503) 656-9596
Toll Free in America: 1 (877) 656-9596   Fax: 1 (877) 656-9756
Email: info@labrix.com
Labrix Iodine Testing – explanation

Dr. Jorge Flechas’ Lab: FFP Laboratories
576 Upward Rd. Suite 8
Flat Rock, NC 28731
Toll Free: 877-900-5556
Fax: 828-697-9020
Email: ffp_lab@yahoo.com

___Dr. Ryan Drum, PhD, one of the world’s experts on seaweeds, the best source of Iodine, also mentions that there is a generational aspect to whether you and your future grandchildren will have a body optimizing Iodine and providing protection for any babies you, your daughters and grand-daughters produce.

Read more here: How Seaweed Heals and How To Get Enough Iodine Read especially if you have chronic disease, have had recent trauma, surgery or are having chemotherapy. Additionally, seaweeds can help if you need anti-viral treatment or get pneumonia. Brown seaweeds are also the only vegetarian source of thyroid hormone able to be used by humans. Dr. Drum also discusses using seaweed as treatment “for prevention of Dioxin and PCB uptake” and to treat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (which he regards as poisoning the brain’s fatty tissue) in troops who have been exposed to chemicals during warfare.

___ It is critical to raise your iodine consumption gradually if you are deficient. Let your organ systems accommodate. You just can’t “catch up quickly” to levels the Japanese use. Too much, too quickly can cause other equally serious health problems. Stay with the amounts Dr. Ryan Drum, PhD, Dr. Abrahams, Dr. Flechas, Dr. Brownstein suggest and work up to 50mg of Iodine a day, over a number of months, even as much as a year.

___ Unless your food happens to be organically-farmed where seaweed actually has been applied as fertilizer, almost no land plants provide iodine, and, as Dr. Drum alerts us, unfortunately, my favorite whole sea salts (Celtic salts) do not have enough, either. There’s just not enough left in even gently-evaporated sea water; you must eat ocean plants (seaweeds) or ocean fish which eat ocean plants to get your Iodine requirement everyday, as Nature intended.

Dr. Ryan Drum, PhD also says, “Individuals with “seafood allergy” seem especially sensitive to iodine. Contrary to some practitioners and their believing patients, he says nobody has “iodine allergy”. No iodine, no life.” Use seaweed as your source rather than fish if you have concerns.

___ SEAWEED IODINE CONTENT from Dr. Drum
Icelandic kelp, 8000 parts per million
Norwegian kelp 4000ppm
Atlantic kelp 1500-2000ppm
Pacific kelps 500-1200ppm
Fucus spp. (species) 200-500ppm
Wakame 50-150ppm
Sargassum 35ppm
Nori 15 ppm

These numbers are estimates and will vary considerably by season, location, age of the plant and harvest practices. Sources for buying these were provided in my previous articles.

___ Dr. Drum has learned that the Japanese and other Asians who eat much more seaweed than the rest of the world does, apparently soak their Kombu and other seaweeds in freshwater for 10-30 minutes prior to using in miso broth (dashi) and other cooking. He says this effectively removes about 60% of the iodine (Hazutosi).

Curiously, he was also told by Japanese nationals that the kombu was then also left in the miso broth for 10-20 minutes and then discarded. It can be used several times, if left to dry out again. And, if you intend to use it several times, then maybe forego the “soaking in fresh water” and just allow the first dashi to have 60% iodine and remaining 2 later dashi soups to have a lesser amount, at least sometimes.

For people like the Japanese and Okinawans, who eat large amounts of seafood and sea veggies, the soaking or prolonged rinsing of high-iodine content seaweeds may reduce the risks for excess iodine-induced disease. But, notice that the all-pervasive “sushi” wrap is made from nori, which has low levels of iodine, and therefore does not require pre-treatment.

Sprinkling dry, cut nori on rice, as a garnish on anything or wrapping sushi, is a good way to get started, along with using about 1t of powdered Japanese-sourced or American-sourced Kombu a day, (to a max in later months of a total of 1Tablespoon of kombu powder per person, spread between 3 meals and snacks most days).

___ Dr. Ryan Drum, PhD also sheds light on another likely wide-spread set of conditions which seaweed can alleviate – potassium deficiency. And, you likely need to take a daily supplement of selenium (this is another mineral researchers find chronically lacking in the general public, and especially in diabetics).

Dr. Drum says, ” I believe that almost any craving for salt in our dietary times of heavily salted (with only “table-salt” i.e. sodium chloride), home-cooking, restaurant meals and preserved foods is a strong indication of potassium deficiency, especially in pregnancy.”

Potassium is an essential mineral, needed for even minimal nerve and muscle functioning. It is also a cross-membrane transporter ion for your brain’s neurotransmittors (like serotonin – which prevents depression) and also for transporting your hormones. This may also help to explain the huge increase in those with depression and other endocrine system disorders, like diabetes.

Dr. Drum has observed that “adding high-potassium foods, especially seaweeds, to the diets of people with A.D.D. (instead of Ritalin) can significantly improve behavior and mental functioning” in children and in adults.

Similarly, fibromyalgia patients, who are: exhausted, forgetful, moody and agitated, as well as those with: anxiety disorders and depression are all favorably improved with high-potassium diets and seaweeds.

Talk to your physician about this and have your doctor contact Dr. Drum (contact info is on his web-site http://www.ryandrum.com.
Potassium supplementation and levels must always be monitored carefully. Too much and too little are both bad.

Well, we’re not done yet, but it’s enough for now.

Best to all — Em

Read more in the Title Archive on the upper navigation bar.

(c)2009 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com
If you would like to quote from or include this article, please contact me at the About Me page above in order to get permission. Please respect my copyright. Thanks!

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

If I just had a chance to grab 3 or 4 supplements in an emergency, to help keep my Health and to prolong my life, Iodine containing foods would be one of them (or a special supplement, I mention in the prior articles below). Yes, Iodine is that important.

Iodine is especially essential for diabetics. Indeed, it is essential for everyone, as most people are definitely deficient.

Read my first two articles  so you can be up to speed on the “why” of Iodine.

Iodine and Health for Everyone – Part 1

Iodine and Health – Part 2

Now that you’ve done that reading, let’s continue with some ways to use seaweeds, the most iodine-rich, alkaline food.

___ I use powdered Kombu seaweed to make soups with a creamy-rich texture without the dairy or less-nutritious thickeners. I sprinkle it in stews to make a thicker, more nutritious sauce than flour, arrowroot or cornstarch would give. Ditto for salad dressing. I sneak it into baked goods or pancakes. Luckily, Iodine is not harmed by heat. I use it as a topper for rice, along with other choices. It has a pleasant sea flavor which is not aggressive or strange. Use it to substitute for salt in any savory smoothie. Sneak a little into some other smoothies. Add some to pickled foods. You have to be inventive as most modern western cookbooks won’t have seaweed recipes.

___ I use a lot of Japanese recipes. Their cooks are the masters of seaweed cuisine, and it goes way beyond just wraps for sushi. You’ll also find recipes in Welsh books (as laver), in Macrobiotic cookbooks and in many other cuisines on a varying scale. In these recipes, I use the real sheets of seaweed.

___ You can also make your own version of Gomashio, a shelf stable condiment using Celtic sea salt and organic ingredients.

Seaweed has virtually no calories, is rich in fiber as well as Iodine and it has just about every needed trace mineral known to humankind.

Here is an adaptable recipe.
========================================================================

Em’s Kaisou Salada Serves 4

Make ahead:
5 grams ( 1/8 oz.) EACH dried wakame, dried arame and dried hijiki seaweeds I use only Eden Foods brand, as they source their organic seaweeds carefully.

1) In two separate bowls, soak the arame and hijiki together for 30 minutes, and in the other bowl, soak the wakame for 10 minutes.

130 grams (4 ozs.) enokitake mushrooms (tiny white mushrooms with long stems — in good supermarkets refrigerated or Asian produce section) (optional)

2) Trim the hard stems off each bunch of mushroom stalks, divide the bundles, keeping the mushrooms intact and whole.

2 scallions (spring onions, green onions) and ice water with cubes

3) Cut the onions into 1 1/2″ long thin strips and plunge into the ice water so they curl up.

1/2 English cucumber, cut lengthwise, cut into thin, half-moon slices

1 bunch of red radishes, washed and sized as desired. (Also, wash the leaves and dry them. Use for soups or stir frys.) OR use a desired amount of white icicle (daikon) radish

4) Cook the wakame and enokitake mushrooms in boiling water for 2 minutes. Add the arame and hijiki for a few seconds and immediately remove from the heat and then drain.

5) Transfer to a bowl. Sprinkle on marinade from 1 1/4 teaspoon of Celtic sea salt and 15 ml (1 Tablespoon) organic brown rice vinegar while the weeds and mushroom mix is still warm. Then, chill everything in the refrigerator.

Salad Assembling:

Make the salad Dressing:
60 ml (4 Tablespoons) organic brown rice vinegar
7.5 ml (1 1/2 teaspoons) organic toasted sesame oil
15 ml (1 Tablespoon) organic shoyu or tamari soy sauce
1 Tablespoon water (with a pinch of dashi-no-moto powder, if desired)
2.5cm (1 inch) piece of fresh ginger root, finely grated (or slivered)

1 package fresh washed organic Mesclun mixed spring greens
organic sesame seeds and // or organic hemp seeds

1) Place greens in a large bowl, add cucumber and radish slices, then top with the seaweed-enokitake mixture. Garnish with the spring onion curls and the seeds and then serve each portion with some dressing, just before eating.

Additional Options:
___ 12 cooked tiger prawns, cooled
___ 4 – 6ozs. of steamed, then cooled cold-water, ocean fish fillet, per person e.g. cod, halibut, sardines, Atlantic pollock, haddock.
___ up to 1 1/2 teaspoons of superfine sugar or equal amount of low glycemic agave nectar to the salad dressing
___ add lightly steamed carrot slices or fully steamed sweet potato cubes
___ fresh dill or fresh cilantro (for detoxification and flavor)

Enjoy!
====================================================================
This is delightful pH alkaline food.

Best to all — Em

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(c)2009 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com
If you desire to use or quote more than a couple of sentences from my article, please write for permission to the About Me page on the upper navigation bar. Please include the address of the site where you wish to use it. Thanks!

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

Last week I shared the incredible importance for diabetics and everyone else to have optimal blood levels of iodine and iodide — for successful metabolism, weight-loss, robust immunity and to cure or alleviate many afflictions, including both kinds of DIABETES! You need to Read Diabetics, Iodine and Health – Part 1, here! Now, here’s Part 2.

Many people do not realize that soda pop, in addition to the dangerous sugars or high fructose corn syrup, also contains bromine (in Mountain Dew, Fresca and even orange Gatorade, among others). Bromine takes over your vital receptors meant for iodine.

Mainstream bakery products and pesticides are other large sources of contaminating bromine. Check artisan breads as they are less likely to use dough “conditioners” as they tend to let dough rise naturally and get the proper texture from Time and Temperature after kneading.

Chlorine and Fluorine do the same thing, blocking receptors for Iodine’s use. In fact, the very Iodine you desperately need is actually excreted, if the receptors have already been occupied by the other Halogen Family members, Chlorine, Bromine or Fluorine.

If your municipal water is chlorinated and / or fluoridated, stop drinking it! Use a dechlorinator* in your bath / shower too, as much of the contaminant is chlorine as gas breathed in with the steam. To drink, use spring waters or professionally filtered waters, in the hope that they are removing the fluoride and chlorine.

Then, become an advocate to prevent the fluoride, a toxic by-product from the aluminum industry, from being used (for NO good reason) in YOUR water. There’s no proof it helps with dental cavities, when you look at the hard science studies.

The application of chlorine serves a safety purpose while water is traveling to your home, but it should be removed just before you use your water to bathe or drink.

Other Iodine robbers include Iodine-depleting prescription drugs and over-the-counter preparations (OTC), e.g. aspirin, coumadin / warfarin and steroids. If you have been taking these drugs, you must take the Dr. Broda Barnes, MD Temperature Protocol test at home, to more-accurately check your thyroid function! See below.**

Now that we’ve tried to erase the environmental saboteurs, back to Iodine, itself!

Living in the Pacific Northwest, with large Asian populations and beaches where seaweed is actively harvested, I come to this discussion with a very positive view of seaweed consumption. I truly enjoy all the different seaweeds which I’ve eaten. I use many regularly, and the unique ones I’ve tried were tasty, too.

Nori, Ao Nori, Kombu, Wakame, Dulse, Kelp and Hijiki are my favorites. But, there are many more for me to try! More on sources, below.

Dr. Ryan Drum, PhD, is a former university professor and researcher in cell biology and chemistry. Now, he teaches herbology at Seattle’s famed Naturopathic Medical School – Bastyr University. Ryan is a practicing medical herbalist who conducts workshops in his specialty, seaweeds.

Seaweeds are important as they are the best natural Iodine / iodide sources, and as at least 1 in every 10 women in America have already been diagnosed with thyroid problems, Iodine is vital.

And, this thyroid epidemic is actually much worse, as mainstream medicine’s blood “tests” do NOT truly show the problem. Some endocrinologists say 1 in 4 women have over-active or under-active thyroids. Women are more at risk because female thyroids are automatically twice as large as males’, so women need much more Iodine in their diet! So, diabetic women can have a double-whammy, and need Iodine, for sure.

And, stress, for anyone, also creates the need for more dietary Iodine for your thyroid. Many ethnic groups are also at increased risk — read more about Wilson’s Syndrome.

About 17 years ago, my naturopathic physician introduced me to this next test, and I have always been “borderline”. But, as my symptoms are worsening, I have begun to use much more seaweed than before. My doctor explained the only accurate way for you to monitor your thyroid yourself is using famed endocrinologist Dr. Broda Barnes, MDs temperature protocol. It will accurately assess your thyroid’s well-being. See below.**

Dr. Ryan Drum knows the most about how the iodine in seaweed can improve your thyroid’s function. Seaweed’s good form of Iodine (isotope 127) protects you against the harmful Iodine (isotope 131 form) which we absorb from our environment thanks to the Nuclear Industry – from above-ground nuclear testing and also from nuclear power plants. The only protection is to stop absorption if we breathe it in. How do you do that?

Diabetics, and everyone else, needs to learn to eat seaweed! You cannot overdose on Iodine when it is eaten as food.

Seaweed’s good Iodine isotope 127 is also protective:
___ before and after having Cat Scan and X-ray radiation
___ being the first line of defense in the Iodine 131 environmental pollution
___ for breast cancer, ovarian and endometrial cancers. Low iodine increases the production of estrogens and your lifetime exposure amount of estrogen factors into your cancer risk. Obese people have more estrogenic activity (men make estrogen too, source of “man boobs”).
___ and helpful in all the conditions you learned about in Part 1, including diabetes!

70 years ago, the average American ate 500 – 800 micrograms of Iodine a day in their usual diet. In 1995, the average American only ate 135 micrograms! Good iodine foods were being eliminated and / or people vastly increased the iodine-depletors, as well as the nuclear age happening, with it’s harmful Iodine 131 pollution to latch-on to our body receptors.

Dr. Drum personally uses 5 – 10 grams of brown and red seaweeds daily! That’s about 1.75 ozs. Aim to work up to getting about one Tablespoon of powdered kelp a day , either by sprinkling on food or in capsules (buy filled or do it yourself), over the next few weeks. Seaweed is an alkaline pH food, and that is another reason that it is SO important and healthful for us! See note below if you are already on thyroid medication.

Brown seaweeds like the kelps (especially the Fucus species) are highest in Iodine. Hijiki is also good. Brown kelps contain 500 – 1,500 parts per million of Iodine. Nori has 15 ppm of Iodine — big difference. Nori is the seaweed used in sushi wraps. I suggest using powdered kombu (a kelp), in just about everything. It is the seaweed used in Japanese dashi soup-stock which is a basic component of healthy Japanese diet choices. Heating does not affect Iodine content.

The red seaweeds, including Dulse, Nori and Gracellaria are also helpful. Nori is easy to find in health stores. Get organically farmed seaweeds or those harvested in pristine areas. You will not find the organic, clean ones in Oriental Groceries; they are of unknown origin.

All seaweeds are edible says Dr. Nan Fuchs, PhD. But seaweed from polluted waters is NOT safe to eat!

Get your seaweed only from reliable sources, from people who harvest them in the cleanest waters possible, like the ones I mention below. Much seaweed is sourced from China these days. BEWARE of any Chinese foods; they have heavily polluted their land, waters, sea and air, without regulations or cleanup, so their products are unhealthy!

SOURCES: Use these as part of a healthy diabetic food plan.

Dr. Drum harvests seaweed and brokers it through another well-regarded sales outlet mentioned on his site.

James Jungwirth offers powdered seaweeds in capsules — Fucus species and 5 other red and green seaweeds from Oregon. P.O. Box 150, Williams, Oregon, USA. Phone: 541-846-7995.

Ocean Harvest Sea Vegetable Company in Mendocino, California have recipes on their website and sell online. I have tried some alaria and sea palm from them and some pickled seaweeds I purchased in Mendocino may have been theirs, too. Ocean Harvest Sea Vegetable Company in Mendocino. They sell the seaweeds in as little as 1 oz. packages, so you can try LOTS of different kinds easily.

This is the source of the Organic seaweed products which I have used for 30 years. They also have a recipe book.
Maine Coast Sea Vegetables Company: lab-certified organic seaweeds

and I have also used these products for at least 30 years. Eden Organic Foods – Seaweed choices

The protocol for using seaweed for those who are already on thyroid medication is different and you and your physician might arrange a telephone consultation with Dr. Drum to understand the procedure. Contact Dr. Drum at his website; he does his phone consultations between 6 am and 10am Pacific Coast Time.

ARTICLES:
About Maine Sea Coast Vegetables.
Seaweed Superfoods

* for dechlorination:
Rainshow’r products

** Dr. Broda Barnes. MD procedure for home-testing.
If you have severe arthritis, this test may not work as well for you as minute muscle twitching may raise your temperature on the thermometer; in this instance, if your temperature ins above 98.2F during the test, get more guidance from a properly trained naturopathic physician.***

*** I regard properly trained naturopathic physicans to have degrees from College of Naturopathic Medicine, Portland, Oregon, Bastyr University, Seattle, Southwest College of NM in Scottsdale. Arizona, the Naturopathic medical colleges in Toronto, Canada and in Connecticut, USA. Naturopaths trained in Australia are usually well-trained as are German and Swiss naturopaths. Often, naturopathic physicians have several medical degrees.

Best to all — Em

(c)2009 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com
If you desire to quote from or use my material, please write for permission to the About Me tab on the upper navigation bar. Thanks.

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