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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

Continuing with the Culinary Herbs Useful to Diabetics series, here are some more recipes! Food IS Medicine, just as Hippocrates, the father of western medicine said. Indian Ayurveda – humanity’s oldest medical system, which birthed all the rest – uses food as medicine, too. Join a long lineage of healing with foods for diabetic treatment.

Here are 3 sweet potato recipes today. This food is a nutritional powerhouse and can fulfill important fiber requirements, as well as boosting Vitamin A nourishment critical for diabetes — by helping to support your eyes’ and skin’s Health with the vitamin’s building block: beta-carotene.

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MASHED SWEET POTATOES WITH LAVENDER AND LIME
from the Lavender Cookbook by Sharon Shipley

2 lbs organic sweet potatoes
1 stick organic, unsalted butter, melted (or equivalent of organic coconut oil)
1/4 C fresh lime juice
1/2 t crushed Certified Organic Jardin du Soleil Culinary Lavender*
Celtic or other sea salt and freshly ground pepper
minced fresh cilantro leaves (do not cut ahead of time)
grated zest of one lime
cayenne pepper, to taste — start with 1/8t and work upwards

This food may be made up to 2 days ahead and refrigerated. Then, rewarm it to serve. Sweet potatoes are an excellent alkaline pH food!

___   Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
___   Prick the sweet potatoes several times with a fork, and then place on a foil-lined baking sheet. Bake for 1 hour, or until very soft. Set them aside until cool enough to handle. Be careful, as they retain their heat.
___   Scoop the flesh right up to the skin’s border. Discard the skins.
___   Using a blender or food processor, pulse until a smooth mixture forms.
___   Stir in the butter, lime juice and lavender.
___   Next, season with salt, fresh pepper and cayenne pepper to taste.
___   Just at serving time, top with cilantro and lime zest, and serve. Do not cut the cilantro ahead of time, as it can impair the flavor.

*Lavender can be finely ground in a spice grinder, a mortar and pestle or in a thoroughly-cleaned coffee grinder (least recommended).

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EM’S SWEET POTATO HUMMUS SPREAD

Because sweet potatoes and coconut are excellent pH alkaline foods, I added, the following to offset the acidic pH of the beans:

___   steamed sweet potatoes (about 2 cups, cubed small) to 1 tub of Trader Joe’s Roasted Red Pepper Hummus (10 oz. size)

___    add a dash of Coconut Secret’s Coconut Aminos (from Whole Foods or coconutsecret.com)

___   Spread it on NO Thiamin Mononitrate crackers or breads! Check the labels, as this synthetic B vitamin flour additive is harmful. Natural, whole-grain breads from health stores are less likely to have it at all.

For those who do not have a Trader Joe’s nearby, the ingredients listed are: 

___   ground chickpeas (you can use healthier cooked black-eye peas or dal)

___   tahini (sesame seed paste) – from health stores or Mid-East markets

___   fresh puree of organic red bell pepper or bottled pimento

___   (canola) oil – use extra-virgin olive oil instead

___   sea salt, lemon juice, garlic powder

If you make this at home, using a standard recipe like the one below, then you will not have the stabilizers in commercial hummus, either (which I did not show here), and you will be making a better pH alkaline food.

This would be great in children’s school lunches! And, it’s a perfect after school snack, too, as well as hors d’ouvre.

Home-made can always be healthier with the right recipe. Next time, I’ll make mine, but in a pinch, combining better ingredients into the Trader Joe’s product made it healthier.

Original recipe

SWEET POTATO HUMMUS
From Jaclyn Enchin ~ http://www.sketch-freeveganeating.blogspot.com

Makes 6 servings

1 medium sweet potato, cooked
1 C  cooked chickpeas
2 T tahini (unsweetened sesame seed paste)
1 T  olive oil
1 T   lemon juice
2-3 t  coconut aminos (a protein source, salty-perky taste)
1 sm  garlic clove, fresh
1 t   cumin
1/2 t  cinnamon
1 t  coriander, fresh
Pinch of sea salt
black pepper, to taste
diced or sliced organic almonds, for topping

Combine all above ingredients into a food processor and blend until smooth.

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MAKING THE PERFECT OMELET

Eggs are nutritious for diabetics, but there are some guidelines to have them be the healthiest.

Firstly, they should be organic, vegetarian fed, free-range animals producing the eggs. Next, the eggs should never be whisked together as breaking the yolks exposes them to oxygen which is when the oxidized yolks become unhealthy, engendering heart disease.

Unbroken yolks have natural balancers (lecithin +) and are heart-healthy.

So, only cook intact eggs – either boiling, coddling, poaching (my favorite) or making the unique omelet technique I explain below but separating the eggs first.

In my method, the egg whites are beaten as directed. The unbroken egg yolks are added later as filling. Add the diabetic herbs at the same time as the yolks — desired savory combinations of turmeric (which will help color the eggs to the usual more yellow look; garlic, fresh onion (minced small), rosemary (ground fine),  cayenne pepper, fresh basil, parsley, ginger. For a sweet-oriented omelet, use diabetic-friendly lavender (grind finely), ginger or cinnamon. Disperse the herbs well over the entire surface.

America’s Test Kitchen explains why this recipe works:

“In contrast to half-moon diner-style omelets, the French omelet is a pristine rolled affair.”  Critically, the temperature of the pan must be just right, the eggs beaten just so (NO, as explained above — I adapt this part!), and hand movements must be swift. This usually intimidates home cooks, but it need not.

In their experiments, America’s Test Kitchen (ATK) (a PBS TV show) ditched the stuffy attitude and came up with a foolproof method for making the ideal French omelet — unblemished outer surface with an ultra-creamy texture, rolled around minimal filling (the diabetic herbs are perfect, along with some cheese, or not).

The classic French method requires a black carbon steel omelet pan and a fork. A nonstick skillet worked fine here (but I am NOT a fan of these pans which always must be used a medium or lower heat ranges).

Instead of a fork, which will scrape nonstick pans (also hazardous to ingest the coating), ATK used bamboo skewers and wooden chopsticks which made small curds with a silky texture. They tested various pans and the Kitchenaaid non-stick at about $20 was fine, if pre-warmed as directed. The Julia Child and Calaphon pans were expensive and excellent.

Adding a little oil, and then preheating the pan for 10 minutes over low heat eliminated any hot spots. For creaminess, very cold butter was added just after the egg (whites) were in the pan. The cold butter dispersed evenly and fused with the eggs for a moist, rich omelet.

To keep the omelet light, ATK found the perfect number of strokes — and, as it’s the egg whites which hold the “loftiness”, my changes should not affect this much, if at all. They used precisely 80 strokes with a classic metal hand-whisk, not one stroke less or more. Be exact here! Copper bowls also help to add lightness to egg whites, so I suggest a copper bowl for my version technique, if you have one. Make sure to keep a copper utensil well-cleaned, as the copper-oxide coating is not healthy.

Excessive beating physically unravels egg proteins, leading to denseness!

For cooking temperature, they tried different heat levels, but even at medium heat, the omelet cooked so quickly it was hard to judge when it was done.  Therefore, turn off the heat when it is still runny (add the egg yolks and herbs) and cover it to finish cooking!

Finally, for an easy rolling method, which mirrors a classic French presentation, slide the newly-cooked omelet onto paper towel. Then, use the towel to start to roll the omelet into the sought-after cigar-shape cylinder.

Because making omelets is such a quick process, make sure to have all your ingredients and equipment at the ready — this is called “mise en place”.

If you don’t have skewers or chopsticks to stir the egg whites, then use the handle of a wooden spoon.

Warm the plates in a 200-degree oven. Serve on the warmed plates.

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Best to all — Em

REFERENCE:
Diabetes Recipes – Lavender
Diabetes – Herbs that Help — Lavender
Diabetes Recipes – Herb List
Diabetes Medicine Alert
Diabetic Concerns – marjoram and nutmeg
Diabetes – Low Thyroid Connection
Thyroid Connections to Diabetes
Herbal Help Diabetic GI Problems

Diabetics and Essential Fatty Acid Omega-3

Please also read the 4 years of still current articles in my archive. See the tab on the upper navigation bar. The extra page links are at the bottom of the first page.

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(c)2011 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please do not use my articles on junk blogs. I will prosecute you. The only use of my copyrighted article is 2 small paragraphs (with my website address shown) without further permission, from me, in writing. Contact me at the About Me page on the upper navigation bar if you want to share more than 2 paragraphs. Thanks.

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“Everyone Knows Someone Who Needs This Information!” (TM)

I can’t believe that it’s Thanksgiving in one week and Hanukkah begins December 1. That has really caught me off-guard. I already have a husband who’s ill with some kind of influenza, it seems, and I am trying to get him on-the-mend. Everything is always in flux; now it’s even more so. What to do? How can diabetics weather the peaks and valleys and stresses of this spate of seasonal celebrations?

I do it by being organized, which is why it’s a little more scary this year. Another thing I do is trust to my experience, which I will definitely need this year. One more tip, is that I am always paying attention and gathering through the year. I never wait until just Holiday Time.

So, I took my husband to the clinic 2 days ago and will bring him back today.  Hopefully, the physician will see some progress, as we really want to avoid him getting pneumonia from the grungy, small cough that appeared 2 weeks ago, just after he got his flu shot.  It has just slowly progressed to show some lung changes on Wednesday’s  x-ray. So, yesterday, I made him a mighty healing soup.

I am including the recipe here, as I do not want you to get ill if you stress or obsess over the holidays. My soup recipe will help give your immune system the ammunition it needs to kick into high-gear.

My husband is not diabetic, but has other health issues which I have to be careful of, too, which share diabetics’ usual “concerns”.

As Hippocrates said, “Let Food Be Thy Medicine“. That’s a treatment your body knows how to use and you have to be knowledgeable these days or get counsel. I have been taught by family experience and my own use of Food As Cure has been for multiple decades. Now that I am without medical insurance, it’s even more critical knowledge.

One consistent place to find a tradition of using Food As Cure, is in the Chinese Culture. You will be able to find many recipes, some of which may have been used as food cures for thousands of years. I have many Chinese Food Cure books on my shelves, and hopefully you have some family traditions, too.

Many of the things called “old wives tales” in the past are being shown to have a solid basis when science catches up. The grandmothers and mothers of the past were the Healers, and they were good at observing what worked. Even what we think of now as “witchcraft” and “herbalism” were female scientific endeavors which males either didn’t understand or didn’t like handing over any Power to a woman. That’s true, let’s face it.

But, now, it is everyone’s responsibility to be a Healer — and that’s especially true when American medicine and much of western medicine is going in the wrong direction, becoming a spineless shill for Big Pharma. If you can find a more holistic physician, you are lucky.

I’ll be suspending my series about a few of the good doctors out there while we talk about the holidays, and I may resume the series sometime on the New Year. I will return to a couple of the first few physicians, too, Dr. Timothy Harlan, MD, especially, who is just starting to produce a TV series, so he may get wider exposure as “Dr. Gourmet”.

Pay attention to whom you get counsel from, but be proactive and DO learn what you need to know.

Now, on to today’s recipe.

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Em’s Mighty Healing Soup

For 4 servings — in a large soup pot, combine:

1 1/2 cartons of free-range, organic chicken broth – about 1 1/2 quarts

1 medium sweet potato, scrubbed, peeled, diced in 1/2″ slices

1 medium Yukon Gold potato, scrubbed well with peel on, 1/2″ dice

3 large beet leaves and stems, shredded, then diced 1/2″ lengths

about 1/2t  each of dried: garlic powder*, turmeric, oregano, thyme

1/4 C Turkish red lentils, rinsed

1 large piece of kombu seaweed (Eden brand)

1 large piece of Nori seaweed, (Eden Brand)

Add these and bring to the boil, then immediately reduce heat and simmer for approximately 30 minutes.

Then add:

1/2 C well washed organic quinoa

(1)  20+ ounce can organic diced tomatoes (Muir Glen Brand^)

Cook another 10-15 minutes once the pot has returned to heat. You may have to turn it up to boil again and immediately return it then to a good simmer.

Because I kept the heat low for most of the time, I did not need to stand and stir the soup. In fact, I just kept an eye on it while I did more things in the kitchen.

At the end, place the following in a bowl:

about 1 t – 2t of organic extra-virgin olive oil (bowl size determines how much to use)

same amount of Organic, apple cider vinegar with the “mother” enzymes (Eden or Bragg’s or Spectrum Brand)

a tiny pinch of Celtic Sea Salt

splash of lemon juice

about 1/4t Kelp Granules (Maine Sea Vegetables Brand)

Pour in the desired amount of soup and enjoy!

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* I will be explaining why I use each ingredient, and I want to say that I will also be adding fresh garlic cloves next time, and I had wanted to add finely diced fresh onion as garnish, but had used my last one! Onions provide quercetin, an important factor.

If you take coumadin or warfarin or another blood thinner, then pay attention as seaweed will affect your numbers. Seaweed is Nature’s blood thinner. You will need less medicine if you use seaweed regularly. See my previous articles about Seaweed, and Iodine, in the Titles Archive, above.

Many of the ingredients that you can’t find in your local stores, especially if you live outside the United States, you can buy at the companies’ websites.

___ Free-range Organic Chicken Broth – is the best form of “Jewish penicillin”. Science has found many immune-stimulating or modulating substances in chicken soup — as Jewish Mamas have always known!

___   organic sweet potato – this is a very alkaline pH food which will help to “neutralize” some of the pH acidic tissues which is where pathogens hide. Viruses and bacteria require an acidic pH environment to live. If you remain pH alkaline, you are not a host. Sweet potatoes also have good fiber to try to help the gut keep moving even though you may not be physically active as much, if unwell. They are filled with pro-Vitamin A phytosterols which help your body to fight (and protect your eyes).

___   organic Yukon Gold Potato (or white potato) – again, another pH alkaline food, if eaten with the skin and there’s actually a fair amount of Vitamin C in them, too.

___   organic beet greens – these dark green leafies have lots of Vitamin B’s to help us handle stress, which being ill certainly is. They also have lots of Vitamin A which is being covered up by their dark color. I was also hoping that there’s still naturally-occurring nitrates in the leaves and stems, not just the beet bulb. Natural nitrates help to produce nitrous oxide, needed to dilate your vascular system which means more oxygen can be brought deeply into tissues. Oxygen is another “killer” of most pathogens – which tend to be anaerobic organisms. (Natural nitrates are very different as opposed to man-made ones in deli meats, which are cancer-causing.)

___   specific dry herbs: garlic, thyme, oregano and turmeric are all either antivirals, antibacterials or both.  Don’t underestimate the power of these plants. They’ve been used by herbalists for millennia because they work. Science is now just catching up. Fresh herbs are best, but you can use dried to lesser effect.

___   Turkish red lentils – these are acidic pH, as all beans are, in varying degrees, but I needed to add more protein to help tissues repair themselves in the battle with the pathogens, so the pH alkaline foods will help neutralize these beans, too. I chose these lentils because they cook very quickly, but true French green lentils have some remarkable qualities, due to the volcanic soil they are grown in, so I might consider using them, too.

___   organic seaweeds — I used kombu and nori – large leaf portions. They provide Iodine, an essential anti-viral and anti-bacterial and also the full range of minerals. The key here is to use a brand like Eden which is fastidious about the cleanliness and safety of the ocean water where these are harvested. Do not buy Chinese products.

___   organic quinoa — a high protein food to aid tissue renewal and it’s a very alkaline food to help raise pH to levels where pathogens cannot survive. It is also the original alkaline fast-food, as it cooks in about 10 minutes. Use it as a substitute for grains, all of which are pH acidic foods.

___   organic tomatoes — source of lycopene and lutein — important phytonutrients to help with immunity and eye health, and there’s some Vitamin C, but, again, that’s being lost when exposed to heating — so I try to keep the cooking temperature as low as possible and add the Vitamin C foods as late in the process as possible. ^ I use Muir Glen because it has an enameled interior to the can. Most companies use Bispenol A treated liners for canned food, especially tomatoes, which are sub-acidic fruits and can corrode the can. Bisphenol A is now banned in Canada and should be, everywhere. Children, especially, should not be exposed to Bisphenol A.

___   olive oil — source of important essential fatty acids and it’s a healthy food to help with joint pain and heart health — both of which are stressed when dealing with the flu. I prefer organic, but that can be hard to find. Make sure the oil is in a dark glass bottle, and buy a small size. Keep refrigerated or in a cool spot.

___   organic apple cider vinegar with the “mother of vinegar” enzymes — it leaves alkaline ash, so it is considered to bring alkalinity in your body. It is the only vinegar which does this. This vinegar is very good for diabetics and it it aids digestion, so the food value is more available with less work for the ill person

___   Celtic Sea Salt — supplies the full range of ocean minerals, and it is the only one which is assured to have been harvested in truly pristine ocean waters. Get it at Trader Joe’s or from the original preferred source – The Grain and Salt Society. Look them up in Asheville, NC.

___   splash of organic lemon juice – again, lemons may have citric acid, but they leave alkaline ash after metabolism is complete, so they are an alkalizer. Of course they are also a source of Vitamin C, but it is best not exposed to heat. You’re better off having a  real, organic lemon squeezed into pure spring water to drink before your soup or along side – sweeten with a little stevia.

___   kelp granules — more iodine in an easy to use anywhere, anytime format. Even though heat does not deactivate Iodine, I wanted some fresh, just at serving. Iodine is a potent pathogen killer.

Put some of my Mighty Healing Soup into a thermos to take to work if your co-workers are hacking and coughing. And, if you decide to take an Echinacea preparation, which IS effective (contrary to the “science” “reported” in the media where it is being “studied” for “off-label” uses), then be sure to take Echinacea for a maximum of 2 weeks on, then 2 weeks off. Your thymus has to rest and not be constantly stimulated. The traditional use adheres to that timetable and Russian research confirms that wisdom.

Well, I hope you stay well, and we’ll see if I get a post done next week — maybe on Friday. Have a great Thanksgiving!

Best to all — Em

Please use my Titles Archive Tab on the upper navigation bar to learn lots more!

(c)2010 Em at https://diabetesdietdialogue.wordpress.com

Please respect my copyright. You can use 2 short paragraphs, but to quote more, please write for permission at the About Me tab above. Thanks.

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